Character Inspirations Part VI: The Demon Hunter

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The historical sources for Ghastly Affair’s Demon Hunter class range from the vampire-hunting dhampirs and vampirovici of the Balkans, to the witch-hunters that terrorized 17th century Europe and America. Oddly, the hunter of supernatural horrors seems not to have become an established literary trope until the 19th century. The earlier Gothics were thick with agents of the Inquisition, but those characters were always more interested in torturing innocent people than pursuing the actual forces of evil. In Sheridan Le Fanu’s story collection “In a Glass Darkly” (which includes both “Green Tea” and “Carmilla”) we find two scholars and adversaries of the supernatural – Doctor Hesselius, and Baron Vordenburg. Those characters were perhaps the inspirations for Bram Stoker’s iconic Doctor Abraham Van Helsing, easily the best-known and most-influential example of the Demon Hunter. Nowadays, the figure is such an expected part of horror novels, movies, and television shows that is easy to forget that it does not have especially deep roots in literary horror prior to the late 19th century. Nonetheless, it can be one of the most enjoyable archetypes to explore in the context of a role-playing game. With that in mind, here are some people, characters, songs, and images to help inspire the creation of your own Demon Hunter characters.

Some Historical Demon Hunters:
Matthew Hopkins
Karl Ferdinand Von Schertz [Author of “Magia Posthuma”]
Jean Chastel
Johann Heinrich Zopf (or Zopfius) [Author of “Dissertatio de Vampyris Serviensibus”]
Dom Augustin Calmet
Johann Joseph Gassner
Johann Flückinger [Austrian army surgeon who exhumed suspected vampires during the 1731 – 1732 hysteria in Serbia]
Cotton Mather

Some Literary Demon Hunters:
Thomas Carnacki (Carnacki, the Ghost Finder – William Hope Hodgson) [Multi Classed Demon Hunter / Magician]
Harry D’Amour (The Last Illusion, Everville, more. – Clive Barker)
Lila Davenport (Hunter’s Song – William Rutter)
Parl Dro (Kill the Dead – Tanith Lee)
Jonathan Harker (Dracula – Bram Stoker)
Dr. Martin Hesselius (In a Glass Darkly – Sheridan Le Fanu)
Solomon Kane (Red Shadows, etc. – Robert E. Howard)
Ann Radcliffe(!) (Vampire City – Paul Féval)
John Silence (John Silence, Physician Extraordinary – Algernon Blackwood) [Multi Classed Demon Hunter / Magician]
Doctor Abraham Van Helsing (Dracula – Bram Stoker)
Baron Vordenburg (Carmilla – Sheridan Le Fanu)

Special mention to Mina Harker. Although never explicitly stated in the text, the ending of “Dracula” can be read as implying that Mina and Jonathan Harker go on to further study and oppose the vampires of Transylvania.

I have included some examples of the “Occult Detective” variety, for those who prefer to run their Demon Hunters more as demonologists and investigators than slayers. Such characters could be allowed to make their Obsession be oriented towards solving supernatural mysteries, rather than always destroying monsters.

Some Demon Hunters from Movies and Television:
Elizabeth Bennet (Pride and Prejudice and Zombies)
Nick Burkhardt (Grimm)
Clementine Chasseur (Hemlock Grove)
Ichabod Crane (Sleepy Hollow – TV Series)
Grégoire de Fronsac (Brotherhood of the Wolf)
Charles Gunn (Angel – TV Series)
Catriona Hartdegen (Penny Dreadful)
Carl Kolchak (Kolchak: the Night Stalker)
Captain Kronos (Captain Kronos – Vampire Hunter)
Faith Lehane (Buffy the Vampire Slayer)
Jack Marshak (Friday the 13th: The Series)
Sir Malcolm Murray (Penny Dreadful)
Buffy Summers (Buffy the Vampire Slayer)
Professor Timothy Eliot Stokes (Dark Shadows, House of Dark Shadows [Movie])
Peter Vincent (Fright Night)
Ash Williams (The Evil Dead)
Sam and Dean Winchester (Supernatural)

A Few Inspirational Songs:
Defender – Manowar
Evil – 45 Grave
Fight– The Cure
Flash of the Blade – Iron Maiden
God’s Gonna Cut You Down – Traditional. Versions by Johnny Cash, others.
No Quarter – Led Zeppelin
Screaming For Vengeance – Judas Priest
Wrathchild – Iron Maiden

Gallery of Images
1 Carmilla

2 John Hamilton Mortimer - Man attacking a monster - Google Art Project

3 Little Red Riding Hood (?) Wellcome V0049137

4 Ill dict infernal p0132-116 bourreau

Vampire Hysteria in the Eighteenth Century

Prior to the eighteenth century, vampires as such were largely unknown to Western Europe. There were certainly vampire-like beings thought to exist in various places, such as the lamia of classical legend, or the dearg dul of Ireland. However, the word “vampire” (from the Serbian vampir) didn’t enter into the mass consciousness of the West until several incidents in early 1700s Eastern Europe (the most famous of which were the cases of Arnold Paole and Petar Blagojevich). The panic spread across the lands controlled by the Austrian Habsburgs, in places (such as Serbia and Transylvania) where vampire hunting and destruction were long established practices. By the 1730s, the so-called “Vampire Controversy” was ignited in Western Europe by newspaper reports of recent vampire attacks in Serbia (and the subsequent openings of graves to destroy the supposed revenants). French, German, and English authors began discussing vampires in medical treatises, theological texts, and travel journals. Voltaire himself weighed in, stating that the only real vampires were involved in business, tax collection, and finance. By the 1740s, the vampire had become established as an object of fear in Western European countries where it had never before existed in folklore. It wasn’t until the publication of “The Vampyre: A Tale” in 1819, however, that the modern Western image of the vampire as a dapper aristocrat emerged.


Credit for Image 3 : Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org . Copyrighted works available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Random Generation of Late Eighteenth Century Gowns

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1778-jeune-dame-de-qualite-en-grande-robe

The formal gowns of the years before the French Revolution evidenced a level of prodigal luxury unparalleled before or since. Beneath their intricate and powdered coiffures, fashionable women were fantastic spectacles of silk and color glittering in the candlelight. It can be very difficult to spontaneously describe such outfits in a manner that does justice to their decadently extravagant beauty. Using the following tables (especially in conjunction with “Random Generation of Late Eighteenth Century Hairstyles” and “Random Scents for 18th Century Aristocrats”) lets the Presenter extemporaneously evoke the delirious sensory overload of a noblewoman’s presence.

The kind of gown created by these tables is one an aristocratic lady might wear to the opera, a ball, or a formal dinner party. However, even the haughtiest lady wouldn’t spend all day in a gown of figured silk trimmed with gold embroidery, fur, and tassels! There was a definite distinction made between the simpler morning dress and evening wear, and wealthy women would have a second toilette when they would change into their more formal evening outfits.

Naturally, Ghastly Affair Players can also use these table to design the gowns their characters will wear to the next event in High Society. Since cross-dressing (en travesti) was common at the frequent masquerade balls of the Ghastly Age, even players of male characters might find the tables useful. If random results create a monstrosity of clashing colors and designs, roll again – or keep the results to demonstrate the bad taste of a character who ought to know better!

Tables for extemporaneously detailing gentlemen’s outfits, as well as the shoes, fans, and jewelry of aristocratic ladies, will appear in the future “Ghastly Companion to High Society”.

Layers of Dress Worn by Late 18th Century Ladies

Stockings – Shaving one’s legs was a chancy endeavor at the time, so 18th century women always wore opaque stockings that were held up by garters just above the knee.
Shoes – The shoes worn by aristocratic women had heels about 2 or 3 inches high, pointed toes, and were made of leather, wood, and expensive fabrics. They would often be as richly ornamented as a formal gown.
Chemise – A simple dress of white linen worn next to the skin. The cleanliness of the chemise was of paramount importance.
Stays – A conical corset stiffened with whalebone, designed to give shape to the dress. 18th century stays squeeze the breasts upward, and force the back into an upright posture. They might lace in the front or back, and generally have shoulder straps. Stays were worn over the chemise. Stays do not have metal eyelets, and cannot be drawn as tight as Victorian-era corsets.
Panniers (only required at court, and on the most formal occasions) – A framework that extends the skirt up to 3 feet outwards on each side, but not in the front or back. Panniers were generally constructed to collapse upwards when required. Even when panniers aren’t worn, fabric rolls and pads might be worn to make the skirt extend out further.
Petticoat – More than one petticoat may be worn under the skirt for warmth, and to give fullness to the skirt above. It is a common for the skirt of the gown to open in the front to show the front of a decorative petticoat.
Pockets – A pair of pouches attached to a cord or ribbon tied around the waist.­
Engageantes – Circles of lace worn underneath the sleeves, making ruffles that project past the cuffs.
Gown – Composed of bodice and skirt. They may be a single piece, or separate. The skirt will usually have a pair of slits in it that give access to the pockets worn underneath. Skirts are often gathered up into swags and flounces, à la Polonaise.
Fichu – A kind of triangular shawl, often made of lace, which wraps around the neck and shoulders. A fichu covers the decolletage, and can be worn for modesty or warmth.
Gloves – Women always wear gloves in formal situations. Women’s gloves in the period before the French Revolution usually extend to about mid-forearm. And of course, no woman of quality would venture out without her hand fan and jewelry!

Because it was considered indecent to show the full arm (or armpit), outfits were never sleeveless. Revealing the breasts, however, was considered merely naughty. Fashionable dresses often featured necklines low enough to be considered very daring (or even unacceptable) today. Showing one’s legs, however was seriously suggestive and scandalous. Drawers did not exist yet, which is why the gowns needed to be long. Anything like modern panties would have been considered both unfeminine and unhygienic. Even when drawers begin to be worn in the early 19th century, they were open at the crotch. The young man gazing upward in Fragonard’s famous“Les Hasards heureux de l’escarpolette” is thus being treated to a view of much more than the lady’s underwear.

Table 1: Gown Style (d20)

1 – 2 | Robe à la Francaise. The bodice is close in the front, but loose and sack-like in the back.
3 – 4| Robe à la Francaise, with the skirt opening in front to show the petticoat.
5 – 6 | Robe à l’Anglaise. The bodice is closely fitted all around.
7 – 10 | Robe à l’Anglaise, with the skirt opening to show the front of the petticoat.
11 – 14 | Robe à la Polonaise. Closely-fitted bodice, with the skirt gathered into voluminous swags and flounces.
15 – 16 | Robe à la Polonaise, with the skirt opening in front to show the petticoat.
17 | Robe à la Turque: A trailing, robe-like gown open in front. The petticoat is visible.
18 | Robe à la Circassian: A robe-like gown open in front, lacking a train, and with a visible petticoat.
19 – 20 | Chemise à la Reine (Queen’s style chemise): A gown comprised of layers of muslin (usually white), resembling the chemise otherwise worn as underwear. Popularized by Queen Marie-Antoinette. [Roll again if before 1783]

Dresses for court will be worn with wide panniers. Panniers may also be worn for formal dinners, and attending the opera or theater.

Table 2: Gown Fabric (d20)

1 | Brocaded Silk (Patterned) [Roll on Table 5]
2 | Camlet (fabric of mixed silk, wool and cotton) (Solid Color). [Roll on Table 4]
3 | Chiné Silk (with a faintly visible pattern printed on the threads of the warp) [Roll on Table 5]
4 | Cotton (Solid Color) [Roll on Table 4]
5 | Cotton Chintz (Patterned) [Roll on Table 5]
6 | Damask (Patterned) [Roll on Table 5]
7 | Figured Silk (Patterned) [Roll on Table 5]
8 | Linen (Patterned) [Roll on Table 5]
9 | Linen (Solid Color) [Roll on Table 4]
10 | Shot Silk (Two solid colors that show from different angles) [Roll twice on Table 4]
11 | Silk Crêpe (Solid Color, with a textured surface) [Roll on Table 4]
12 – 13 | Silk Satin (Solid Color) [Roll on Table 4]
14 – 15 | Silk Taffeta (Solid Color) [Roll on Table 4]
16 | Quilted Silk Satin (Solid Color) [Roll on Table 4]
17 | Velvet (Patterned) [Roll on Table 5]
18 | Velvet (Solid Color) [Roll on Table 4]
19 | Watered Silk (Single Color, but with a rippling, wavy pattern) [Roll on Table 4]
20 | Worsted Wool (Solid Color) [Roll on Table 4]

Muslin is used for underwear and the Chemise à la Reine. Simple, high-waisted dresses of muslin become fashionable after 1794. Linsey-woolsey is too rough to be used for fine dresses and gowns.

Table 3: Petticoat Fabric (if visible) (d20)

1 – 2 | Calamanco (Glossy woolen cloth) (Solid Color) [Roll on Table 4]
3 | Chiné Silk (with a faintly visible pattern printed on the threads of the warp)
4 – 5 | Cotton (Solid Color) [Roll on Table 4]
6 – 7 | Cotton Chintz (Patterned) [Roll on Table 5]
8 | Figured Silk (Patterned) [Roll on Table 5]
9 | Linen (Patterned) [Roll on Table 5]
10 | Linen (Solid Color) [Roll on Table 4]
11 – 12 | Quilted Calamanco (Glossy woolen cloth) (Solid Color) [Roll on Table 4]
13 – 15 | Quilted Silk Satin (Solid Color) [Roll on Table 4]
16 | Silk Crêpe (Solid Color, with a textured surface) [Roll on Table 4]
17 – 18 | Silk Satin (Solid Color) [Roll on Table 4]
19 | Silk Taffeta (Solid Color) [Roll on Table 4]
20 | Watered Silk (Single Color, but with a rippling, wavy pattern) [Roll on Table 4]

Table 4: Solid Colors for Fabrics (d20)

1 | Blue
2 | Blue-Green
3 | Cream
4 | Deep Indigo Blue
5 | Forest Green
6 | Gray
7 | Gray-violet
8 | Lavender
9 | Pale Blue
10 | Pale Blue-Green
11 | Pale Green
12 | Peach
13 | Pink
14 | Puce
15 | Purple (very expensive)
16 | Red-Orange
17 | Scarlet
18 | Tan
19 | White
20 | Yellow

Black is usually only worn for mourning.

Table 5: Patterned Fabrics (d100)

1 | Blue, with a white floral pattern.
2 | Blue, with white vertical stripes, and rosettes of pink flowers
3 | Blue, with red-orange poppies
4 | Blue, with tan and yellow fruits and flowers.
5 | Blue-Green, with small silver roses widely dispersed.
6 | Blue-Green, with a silver floral pattern
7 | Blue-Green, with a comprehensive floral design in a paler blue-green.
8 | Cream, with curving vines of orange and green from which spring white and blue flowers.
9 | Cream, with red and blue flowers
10 | Cream, with vertical stripes of blue, and red roses interspersed
11 | Cream, with vertical stripes of brown, and dashed lines of red, orange, and white.
12 | Cream, with vertical stripes of orange, from which project green foliage that shades to brown
13 | Cream, with small, widely interspersed red roses.
14 | Cream, with undulating bands of blue.
15 | Deep indigo blue, with cream foliage.
16 | Deep indigo blue, with a covering silver floral pattern
17 | Deep indigo blue, with curving floral bands of ivory enclosing red-orange flowers.
18 | Deep indigo blue, with a comprehensive arabesque design of paler blue.
19 | Forest green, with saw-toothed stripes of cream and gold undulating vertically.
20 | Forest green, with a comprehensive cream floral design.
21 | Forest green, with white roses and pale green leaves in a regular pattern.
22 | Forest green, with a comprehensive floral design in pale green.
23 | Gray, with a silver floral design.
24 | Gray, with large, polychromatic flowers and foliage.
25 | Gray, with a Chinoiserie pattern of pagodas and palm trees in gold.
26 | Gray-violet, with an arabesque floral pattern of silver.
27 | Gray-violet, with a comprehensive arabesque design in white.
28 | Gray-violet, with white vertical stripes, and small rosettes of silver.
29 | Gray-violet, with roses of the palest pink.
30 | Lavender, with an arabesque floral pattern of silver.
31 | Lavender, with vertical stripes of purple and white, and small rosettes of pale blue.
32 | Lavender, with small, dove gray flowers widely dispersed.
33 | Lavender, with a comprehensive arabesque design of white.
34 | Pale Blue, with white and orange flowers, and green foliage.
35 | Pale Blue, with gold and silver flowers interspersed with silver rosettes.
36 | Pale Blue, with a comprehensive, Indienne design of yellow leaves and deep blue flowers.
37 | Pale Blue, with red-orange roses.
38 | Pale Blue-Green, with vertical stripes of cream and red, and white roses between the stripes.
39 | Pale Blue-Green, with a white pattern of stylized sea shells.
40 | Pale Blue-Green, with small, widely dispersed silver flowers.
41 | Pale Blue-Green, with a comprehensive, arabesque design in white.
42 | Pale Green, with undulating vertical bands of white foliage.
43 | Pale Green, with a comprehensive floral design in cream.
44 | Pale Green, with Chinoiserie palm trees in tan.
45 | Pale puce, with thick bands of darker puce foliage creating a pattern of repeating lozenges. In the lozenges are depicted trees, deer, and small cottages.
46 | Peach, with vertical stripes of gold and cream.
47 | Pink, with wide vertical stripes of white, and thin vertical lines of green-blue.
48 | Pink, with thin white vertical stripes, and small flowers of red and blue with green foliage
49 | Pink, with a Chinoiserie floral pattern in gold.
50 | Pink, with curving green foliage from which spring large flowers of red and blue.
51 | Pink, with a comprehensive arabesque pattern in gold.
52 | Puce, with a pattern of white and yellow flowers.
53 | Puce, with thin vertical stripes of white.
54 | Puce, with pale pink flowers.
55 | Puce, with a comprehensive arabesque design in white.
56 | Purple, with red and blue flowers.
57 | Purple, with wide horizontal stripes of yellow.
58 | Purple, with a lavender and gold floral design.
59 | Red-orange, with white and blue flowers.
60 | Red-orange, with a polychrome, Indienne design of stylized flowers.
61 | Red-orange, with a comprehensive arabesque design.
62 | Red, with thin vertical stripes of cream.
63 | Red, with white roses and foliage.
64 | Red, with a polychrome Indienne design of stylized flowers.
65 | Scarlet, cream, and white tartan.
66 | Scarlet, with a Chinoiserie design of pagodas and palm trees in cream.
67 | Tan, with a polychrome Indienne design of peacocks and foliage.
68 | Tan, with flowers and small diamonds of gray.
69 | Tan, with blue, pink and yellow flowers, and green foliage.
70 | Tan, with an arabesque design in cream.
71 | Tan, with an indigo blue floral design.
72 | Vertical stripes of pale blue and cream, with vertical garlands of white flowers.
73 | Vertical stripes of white and palest gray, with a pale floral pattern over all.
74 | Vertical stripes of white and purple.
75 | Vertical stripes of white, purple, and blue.
76 | Vertical stripes of red, blue, and gold.
77 | Vertical stripes of puce and white.
78 | Vertical stripes of pink and white.
79 | Vertical stripes of green and cream.
80 | Vertical stripes of indigo blue and white.
81 | Vertical stripes of scarlet and cream.
82 | Vertical stripes of pink and pale blue.
83 | White with black vertical stripes, accented by occasional sprigs of green foliage and pink flowers.
84 | White, with crossing vines forming a pattern of repeating diamonds, and a small purple flower in the middle of each lozenge.
85 | White, with a repeating pattern of thistles, linked by pale green foliage forming lozenge patterns. In the center of each lozenge is a blue thistle.
86 | White, with occasional red roses
87 | White, with pink roses.
88 | White, with small leaf-like spots of red.
89 | White, with thin brown vines.
90 | White, with a Chinoiserie design of pagodas, flowers, pomegranates, and roosters
91 | White, with an Indienne design of flowers and floral shapes in red and blue.
92 | White, with a silver floral design
93 | White, with a gold arabesque floral design.
94 | Wide vertical stripes of white and red, with a green vine in the middle of each white stripe , and ermine-like spots of white accenting the red.
95 | White, with chevrons of pale purple and blue.
96 | White, with stylized pastoral scenes rendered in blue.
97 | Yellow, with a white arabesque floral design.
98 | Yellow, with a Chinoiserie design of pagodas and phoenixes.
99 | Yellow, with a gold and white arabesque pattern
100 | Yellow, with pale blue and pink flowers.

“Indienne” refers to pattern inspired by East Indian textiles. “Chinoiserie” indicates designs suggestive of Chinese art.

Table 6: Bodice Neckline (d20)

1 | High (completely covers breasts).
2 | High, and wearing a fichu.
3 – 5 | Moderate (halfway down breasts)
6 – 11 | Moderate, and wearing a fichu.
12– 13 | Low (to just above nipples).
14 – 15 | Low, and wearing a fichu
16– 17 | Extremely Low (upper half of nipples exposed).
18 – 19 | Extremely Low, and wearing a lace fichu.
20 | Low, and the dress is deliberately constructed so the wearer’s breasts will occasionally fall out in a way that seems accidental. Anybody wearing such a dress will not spoil the effect with a fichu.

Table 7: Sleeves (d12)

1 | Straight along the arm to the wrist.
2 | Strait to the elbow.
3 | Strait to the elbow, then flaring to a bell.
4 | Straight, with bows at the elbow.
5 | Strait to the elbow, then flaring to a bell accented with bows.
6 | Double puffed to the elbow, with the cuff accented by bows.
7 | Double puffed, flaring to a bell at the elbow.
8 | Double puffed on upper arm, then straight along the forearm to the wrist.
9 | Triple puffed on the upper arm, with the cuff at the elbow.
10 | Triple puffed on the upper arm, flaring to a bell at the elbow.
11 | Flounces of lace, with a cuff at the elbow.
12 | Flounces of lace ending in a flaring bell at the elbow

Engageantes will almost always be worn to create ruffles of lace that project past the actual cuffs of the dress.

Table 8: Fancy Decorations and Passamentarie (d100, 1d8 times)

1 – 8 | A large bow at the neckline of the bodice. [Roll on Table 4 or 5]
9 – 10 | A large bow in front, with numerous small bows about the skirt. [Roll on Table 4 or 5]
11 – 12 | A large bow with hanging ribbons in back of the bodice, where it meets the skirt. [Roll on Table 4 or 5]
13 – 14 | A line of small bows down the front of the bodice.
15 – 16 | A single large bow in front of the skirt. [Roll on Table 4 or 5]
17 – 19 | A wide horizontal ruffle of a contrasting fabric across the front of the skirt.
20 | Beaver fur edging on skirt and bodice.
21 – 21 | Braided gold edging on the skirt and bodice.
23 – 22 | Colored gems sewn into the skirt and bodice.
25 – 26 | Edged of braided cord on skirt and bodice. [Roll on Table 4]
27 – 28 | Edged with puffed swags of the dress’s fabric.
29 – 30 | Edged with braided silver cord on skirt and bodice. [Roll on Table 4]
31 – 32 | Edged with ornamentally knotted cording on the skirt and bodice. [Roll on Table 4]
33 – 34 | Edged with pearls on the skirt and bodice.
35 – 37 | Embroidered trim on skirt and bodice. [Roll on Table 4]
38 | Ermine fur edging on skirt and bodice.
39 – 40 | Foliage and vines of green silk on the skirt.
41 – 42 | Gold embroidery on bodice.
43 – 44 | Gold embroidery on bodice, accented with pearls.
45 – 46 | Gold embroidery on bodice and skirt.
47 | Gray fox fur edging on skirt and bodice.
49 – 50 | Hem of the skirt has a scalloped edge.
50 – 56 | Lacing of wide silk ribbons on the bodice. [Roll on Table 4]
57 – 58 | Large buttons down the front of the bodice.
59 – 60 | Long, ruffled lace edging on the bodice and skirt.
61 – 62 | Mink edging on skirt and bodice.
63 – 65 | Numerous small bows in a line down the front of the skirt [Roll on Table 4 or 5]
66 – 68 | Pearls sewn at intervals on the skirt.
69– 70 | Pearls sewn at intervals onto the bodice.
71 – 73 | Pearls wrapped around the sleeves.
74 – 75 | Quilted puffs like scallop shells, arranged in two wavy vertical lines.
76 – 77 | Ruffled ribbons sewn in undulating lines around skirt.
78 | Sable fur edging on skirt and bodice.
79 – 80 | Sash of a contrasting color around waist. [Roll on Table 4].
81 – 8 | Short, ruffled lace edging on the bodice and skirt.
83 – 84 | Silk roses down the front of the skirt.
85 – 86 | Silver embroidery on bodice.
87 – 88 | Silver embroidery on bodice, accented with pearls.
89 – 90 | Silver embroidery on bodice and skirt, accented with pearls.
91 – 92 | Small silk flowers on the skirt.
93 – 94 | Swags of a contrasting fabric bound at intervals with pearls. [Roll on Table 4 or 5]
95 – 96 | Tassels hanging from bows on the skirt. [Roll on Table 4]
97 – 99 | Tassels hanging from pearl clusters on the skirt. [Roll on Table 4]
100 | Undulating lines of cording like vines, with hanging bells of lace on the skirt.

Character Inspirations Part V: The Grave Robber

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Ghastly Affair‘s Grave Robber class represents not only desperate resurrection men looting recent burials, but also aristocratic antiquarians rifling through ancient barrows. In fact, 18th and early 19th century archaeology was often little more than grave robbing, and the great museums of the Western world were partially founded upon the spoils of looted tombs. By the 19th century, stealing bodies for medical research was mostly a phenomena of United Kingdom, United States, and British colonies. Thieves everywhere, however, dug up new graves for clothing and jewelry, as well teeth for dentures.

Some Historical Grave Robbers (Body Snatchers, Antiquarians, and Physicians):
Thomas Bateman
William Burke
Ben Crouch (See “The Dairy of a Resurrectionist”, page 128)
William Cunnington
Bernardino Drovetti
Bill Hartnett (See “The Dairy of a Resurrectionist”, page 130)
Jack Hartnett (See “The Dairy of a Resurrectionist”, page 131)
William Hare
Sir Richard Colt Hoare
Charles Knowlton
Tom Light (See “The Dairy of a Resurrectionist”, page 132)
Joseph (or Joshua) Naples (See “The Dairy of a Resurrectionist”, page 136)
Girolamo Segato [Multi-Classed Grave Robber / Mad Scientist]

Some Literary Inspirations:
Jerry Cruncher (A Tale of Two Cities – Charles Dickens)
The Editor (The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner – James Hogg)
Doctor Fettes (The Body Snatcher – Robert Louis Stevenson)
Doctor Wolfe Macfarlane (The Body Snatcher – Robert Louis Stevenson)
Jonathan Oldbuck, Laird of Monkbarns (The Antiquary – Sir Walter Scott)
Muff Potter (The Adventure of Tom Sawyer – Mark Twain)
William Shiel, and W. Sword (The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner – James Hogg)
St. John, and the Narrator (The Hound – H.P. Lovecraft)

Some Grave Robbers from Movies and Television:
Arthur Blake (I Sell the Dead)
Fanny Briers (I Sell the Dead)
Timothy Broom (The Doctor and the Devils)
Robert Fallon (The Doctor and the Devils)
The Graverobber (The Horror of Frankenstein)
Willie Grimes (I Sell the Dead)
Indiana Jones (Raiders of the Lost Ark)
Ygor (Son of Frankenstein)

A Few Inspirational Songs:
The Ballad of Resurrection Joe and Rosa WhoreRob Zombie
Cold Ethyl Alice Cooper
Dig Up Her BonesMisfits
The Hearse SongTraditional. Versions by Harley Poe, and various others
I Like (You Too)Heathen Dan
I Love The DeadAlice Cooper
Skull Full of MaggotsCannibal Corpse
SkullsMisfits

Gallery of Images
1 Two anatomists dissecting a corpse, surrounded by birds, a c Wellcome V0010464

2 Rowlandson - The Anatomist

3 Resurrectionists by phiz

4 Rowlandson - Resurrection Men

5 The Anatomist Overtaken by the Watch

6 Museo del Prado - Goya - Caprichos - No. 12 - A caza de dientes

Manufacturing Mummies

One facet of the Egyptomania that swept Europe in the very early 19th century was a fashion among the wealthy for displaying mummies. The mummies might even be unwrapped in front of gathered groups. Of course, there weren’t actually enough genuine mummies to satisfy the demand – considering that ground up mummies had long been used as a paint pigment, and a medicine! Naturally, enterprising Egyptian grave robbers stepped up to remedy the situation. The corpses of criminals and the indigent were dried out and wrapped in bandages to create create counterfeit mummies for the European market. Sometimes, the corpses of disease victims were used. If the cases and coffins weren’t complete fabrications, they would be cobbled together from various broken bits and pieces looted from actual ancient tombs.


Credit for Image 1 : Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org . Copyrighted works available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Random Scents for 18th Century Aristocrats

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Elegant woman by Jollain

The Ghastly Age (1765 – 1820) was an odoriferous time. Modern life in the West has been largely scrubbed of the type of smells that were once part of everyday life – eviscerated animals, open sewers, unwashed bodies, and horse excrement. While Marie-Antoinette and Napoleon both took perfumed baths almost every day, even most other aristocrats found it difficult to manage a daily immersion. To cover up any personal body odor, and counteract the foul smells all round them, wealthy people of the 18th century drenched themselves in perfume. An aristocrat might wash their face, hands, feet, and intimate areas with perfumed water, put on a perfumed chemise or undergarment, apply perfume to their skin, and perfume their hair (or wig). Ordinary items, such as books and bedding, were often scented. Leather gloves were almost always scented as well, and pastilles of perfumes were burnt in bedrooms to counteract the smell of chamber pots (and the stink of the streets).

Remember that before the Victorian age, it was not considered unsophisticated for a woman (or man) to wear a single scent, such as rose or musk. Josephine Bonaparte, for example, often wore just jasmine or violet. Some more-or-less standardized mixtures, such as the citrusy Eau de Cologne (beloved by Napoleon) were popular. Most aristocrats, however, had their own perfumes mixed especially for them. Scents for men could be much more floral and sweet than would be considered “masculine” today. Likewise, women’s perfumes often featured deep musk, and other animal smells. The wearing of heavy perfume did not go out of style for men until after the English dandy (and fashion dictator) “Beau” Brummell started appearing in society smelling only of freshly laundered clothes.

Perfumers, Aristocrats, and characters with an Asset such as “Connoisseur of Perfumes”, will all be able to pick out the separate notes of a scent. Someone benefiting from a preternaturally Enhanced Sense of Smell might be able to not only analyze the odor, but also discern the origin of the materials, know when the perfume was applied, and deduce the wearer’s activities since application! An uneducated footpad, however, might only know whether or not someone smells nice.

What Does This Aristocrat Smell Like?

For Women: Roll 1d6 times on Floral Scents, and 1 time on Non-floral Scents.
For Men: Roll 1d6 times on Non-floral Scents, and 1 time on Floral Scents.

Floral Scents (d10)
1 | Geranium
2 | Jasmine
3 – 4 | Lavender
5 | Lilac
6 | Narcissus (Daffodil)
7 | Orange Blossom
8 | Rose
9 | Tuberose
10 | Violet

Non-Floral Scents (d100)
1 | Amond
2 | Anise
3 | Balsam
4 – 5 | Bitter Orange
6 – 10 | Body Odor (from not having bathed recently)
11 | Cedar
12 | Cinnamon
13 – 22 | Civet (a deeply musky and somewhat sweet odor)
23 | Cloves
24 | Earth (from Patchouli)
25 | Frankincense
26 | Fruity Wood (from agarwood)
27 | Ginger
28 | Grapefruit
29 | Hay (from tonka beans)
30 | Honey
31 | Juniper
32 – 36 | Leather (from castoreum)
37 – 38 | Lemon
39 – 40 | Lime
41 | Mint
42 | Moss
43 – 60 | Musk (from the scent pods of asian musk deer)
61 | Myrrh
62 | Nutmeg
63 | Peach
64 | Pine
65 – 66 | Rosemary
67 | Sage
68 – 72 | Sex (from recent lovemaking in their clothes. Eighteenth century people generally had sex without fully undressing. Some libertines might purposefully do this to impregnate their clothing with the scent.)
73 | Smoke
74 –79 | Sweat (from exertion, being near open flames, or perhaps anxiety. Some might deliberately get themselves sweaty. Casanova and Napoleon, for example, both loved the smell of a woman’s sweat)
80 – 89 | Sweet Earth (from ambergris)
90– 91 | Sweet Orange
92 | Sweet Wood (from oakmoss)
93 | Tangerine
94 | Tobacco
95 | Vanilla
96 – 100 | Wood (from vetiver)

The Politics of Perfume

Perfume was so closely associated with the aristocracy that it was actually made illegal in Revolutionary France. Consequentially, it became fashionable to defy the law by wearing especially heavy scents. The gangs of anti-revolutionary young men who terrorized the streets of Paris after the fall of Robespierre were called “Muscadins”, after the musk perfume they wore. The “Incroyables” and “Merveilleuses” who haunted the Palais-Royal during the Directory era (and also affected Royalist politics) wore perfume to be fashionably defiant. The association between scents and politics in France continued under Napoleon, when perfume was made legal again, and the violet became a symbol of the Bonapartists. After his first exile to Elba, Napoleon said he would “return with the violets”. During that time Bonapartists would identify each other by wearing the flower in their clothing, and the perfume on their skin.

Random Generation of 18th Century Feasts

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Convitto in casa Nani alla Giudecca

The meals of eighteenth century aristocrats could be astoundingly extravagant. Eating was not just about satisfying hunger, but an opportunity to display one’s wealth and privilege. A formal “Dinner” was served in three or four “Stages” or courses. At each Stage up to 30 different dishes would be laid on the table at once. Wines, punches, and other beverages would be on a sideboard, and diners would usually be waited upon by their own servants. One way to conceptualize the scene is like a buffet where the guests actually sit at the buffet table. The “Supper” served later in the day was simpler, but still lavish by modern standards.

When describing a dinner or supper, the Presenter or Game Master can create a mood of decadent excess by emphasizing the sensory overload, overindulgence, and hedonistic mania. The dining room will be a riot of smells – food, sweat, burning candles, and expensive perfume. Elaborate decorations (called pièces montées) and candelabra will stand atop the white tablecloth, surrounded by the dishes. The cutlery and service pieces will gleam silver and gold. The ladies will be carefully dressed, coiffured, and glittering with jewels. The room itself will be ornate and hung with paintings. Musicians may be playing, either in the dining hall of an adjacent room. Guests at the table will be expected to maintain their wit and composure, even as they consume ever increasing amounts of wine and liquor. There will certainly be events to gossip about afterwards.

The types of meals created using the tables below might be eaten by aristocrats anywhere in Europe during the Ghastly Age. Remember that well into the 19th century, much of what is now thought of as national cuisine was eaten primary by the middle and lower classes. That was true even in places renowned for their native food, such as Italy. The cosmopolitan aristocracy, who might barely speak the vernacular language of the peasants they ruled over, often ate a similar French-influenced diet no matter where they resided. On the other hand, some products now closely associated with national cuisines, such as Parmesan cheese, were widely popular among the aristocracy. While the diets of the middle and lower classes were strictly seasonal, the wealthy upper classes could have out-of-season fruits and vegetables grown in hothouses, conservatories, and cold-frames.

Before the French Revolution, a “dinner” was usually eaten in the middle of the afternoon, when servants had more light to work by. The less elaborate “supper”, on the other hand, would be eaten in the evening, and sometimes as late as 1 AM. It was very common for visitors to stop by unannounced for supper, and a dance or ball always concluded with one. After the Revolution, the time of dinner in France crept forward to around 6 PM, but supper remained as the final meal of the day in High Society until the 19th century. In her memoirs, the Marquise Henriette-Lucy de la Tour du Pin explains that eighteenth century women were so fond of dinner parties because the high heels and extravagant outfits of the time could make it uncomfortable to dance. At the dinner table, however, one could simply look beautiful and engage in witty conversation.

Speakers of American English should note the terms “Entrée” and “Entremet” mean something different here than then they might expect. In the eighteenth century, an “Entrée” was one of the dishes served at the beginning stage of a meal, and was secondary to the more impressive roasts and main dishes. An “Entremet” was a dish served between two other courses, generally after the roasts and before the actual desserts. The term encompassed egg and cheese dishes, as well as many sweet cakes and tarts.

A Grand Dinner:

First Stage: Roll (or select) 1d8 Soups, 1d8 Fish Entrées, 1d4 Poultry Entrées, and 1d10 Meat Entrées. The number of dishes on the table should be at least equal to the number of diners (up to 30).
Second Stage: Roll (or select) Roasts and Main Dishes, and 1d8 Sauces served on the side. The remaining dishes will be Vegetables and Salads, for a total amount of dishes equal to the First Stage.
Third Stage (Entremets): Roll (or select) Entremets equal to the total amount of dishes in the previous Stage. This stage is sometimes omitted.
Dessert Stage: Roll (or select) Desserts equal to amount of dishes in previous Stages.

An Evening Supper:

First Stage: Roll (or select) 1d4 Soups, 1d4 Fish Entrées, 1d4 Poultry Entrées, and 1d4 Meat Entrées.
Second Stage: Roll (or select) 1d8 Vegetables and Salads, plus as many Entremets as needed to equal the total amount of dishes in the First Stage.
Dessert Stage: Roll (or select) 1d6 Desserts

Soups (d100)

1 – 3 | Almond Soup with Cream
4 – 7 | Calf’s Head Soup
8 – 10 | Capon Soup with Lettuce and Asparagus
11 – 13 | Cock-a-leekie Soup – Scottish style soup of chicken and leeks.
14 – 22 | Consommé of Beef
23 – 30 | Consommé of Chicken
31 – 35 | Crawfish Soup
36 – 37 | Eel Soup
38 – 44 | Mock Turtle Soup (veal)
45 – 46 | Mulligatawny Soup (after 1780) – curried chicken soup
47 – 52 | Onion Soup
53 – 57 | Pea Soup
58 – 62 | Pepper Pot – spicy meat stew from the Americas
63 – 67 | Pigeon Bisque – with cream
68 – 72 | Pureed Asparagus Soup
73 – 77 | Pureed Carrot soup
78 – 79 | Scotch Broth – lamb and barley
80 – 85 | Soupe à la Reine (Queen’s Soup) – creamed chicken and meat broth with rich or barley
86 – 87 | Squab Soup
88 – 93 | Turtle Soup
94 – 98 | Vegetable Soup
99 – 100 | White Soup – made with veal and almonds

Meat Entrées (d100)

1 – 3 | Beef Hachis – chopped beef with pickled cucumbers and onions
4 – 7 | Beef Olives – thin steaks rolled around forcemeat, fried and served with mushroom suace
8 – 10 | Beef Steaks with Oyster Sauce
11 – 14 | Blanquette de Veau – white stew of veal with mushrooms
15 – 17 | Boiled Sausages
18 – 21 | Cabbages Stuffed with Forcemeat
22 – 24 | Calf’s Brains Milanese – coated in breadcrumbs and fried
25 – 28 | Calf’s Foot Fricasee – in white sauce, garnished with lemons and parsley
29 – 31 | Calf’s Heart – stuffed with forcemeat
32 – 35 | Calf’s Sweetbreads
36 – 38 | Chicken Terrine – loaf of pressed, molded meat served cold
39 – 42| Civet de Lièvre (Jugged Hare) – hare cooked in a sealed earthenware dish, served with a sauce of its own blood and wine.
43 – 45 | Fried Chicken Sausages
46 – 49 | Fried Pork Sausages
50 – 52 | Ham Pieces with Spinach
53 – 56| Lamb Chops with Brown Sauce
57 – 59 | Lamb Hachis – chopped lamb served in a brown sauce
60 – 62 | Minced Veal – with lemon pickles and cream
63 – 66| Pâté de Foie Gras – molded paste of goose liver and truffles
67 – 69 | Pork Terrine – loaf of pressed, molded meat served cold
70 – 73 | Rabbit Pâté – rabbit meat reduced to a paste
74 – 76 | Ragoût of Beef – stewed beef with carrots
77 – 80 | Ragoût of Pig’s Ears and Feet – garnished with parsley
81 – 83 | Roasted Hare with Bread Sauce
84 – 87 | Salmagundi – English, composed salad of chicken, eggs, ham, and herring, garnished with capers and oysters
88 – 91 | Veal Callops – thin slices served in white sauce
92 – 95 | Veal Terrine – loaf of pressed, molded meat served cold
96 – 100 | Venison Terrine – loaf of pressed, molded meat served cold

Fish Entrées (d100)

1 – 2 | Baked Haddock with Butter and Bread Crumbs
3 – 4 | Baked Salmon Stuffed With Oysters
5 – 6 | Boiled Skate Served with Horseradish
7 – 8 | Boiled Sole with Eggs
9 – 10 | Broiled Mullet with Lemon
11 – 12 | Cod Ragout, with Oyster Sauce
13 – 15 | Crabs – dressed in butter and served on their shells
16 – 17 | Crawfish in Aspic
18 – 19 | Curried Lobster *
20 – 21 | Eels Stewed in Wine
22 – 25 | Escargot with Garlic Butter
26 – 27 | Filet of Sole with Mushrooms and Truffles
28 – 29 | Fish in Aspic
30 – 30 | Fried Eels
31 – 32 | Fried Frog’s Legs
33 – 34 | Fried Mackerel with Anchovy Sauce
35 – 36 | Fried Scallops in Veal Sauce
37– 38| Fried Smelts
39 – 40| Grenouilles à la Lyonnaise – frog’s legs with onions and parsely
41 – 42 | Lobster Fricassee *
43 – 44 | Lobster meat with butter *
45 – 46 | Lobster Paté *
47 – 48 | Mackarel à la Maitre d’Hotel – with herbed butter
49 – 50 | Oyster Paté
51 – 52 | Oyster Pie
53 – 54 | Oysters on the Half Shell (roll again if meal occurs in the summer)
55 – 56 | Pickled Mackerel
57 – 58 | Pickled Oysters
59 – 60 | Pickled Smelts
61 – 62 | Poached Cod’s Head
63 – 64 | Pot Shrimp – pounded to a paste and formed into a loaf
65 – 66 | Potted Salmon – pounded to a paste and pressed into a loaf
67 – 68 | Salmon – cooked in paper with mushrooms
69 – 70 | Salmon Steaks with Butter
71 – 72 | Salt Cod with Egg Sauce
73 – 74 | Smelts in Aspic
75 – 76 | Stewed Cockles
77 – 78 | Stewed Lampreys
79 – 80 | Stewed Mussels
81 – 82 | Stewed Oysters
83 – 85 | Stewed Oysters in Cream
86 – 90 | Turbot with Herb Sauce
91 – 96 | Turtle Meat – shredded and served on its shell
97 – 100 | Whole Poached Carp – with cucumbers arranged as scales
* When a scene is set in the American colonies (and the later United States), roll again if lobster is indicated. Lobster is so plentiful and cheap there that it will not be served at a formal dinner.

Poultry Entrées (d100)

1 – 5 | Boiled Duck with Onion Sauce
6 – 5 | Braised Ducklings
11 – 5 | Chicken à l’Italienne – fried, with mushrooms, onions, ham & herbs
16 – 5 | Chicken in Aspic
21 – 5 | Chicken Pâté
26 – 5 | Chickens Roasted on a Spit
31 – 5 | Duck Galantine – boneless, stuffed with forcemeat, and coated in aspic.
36 – 5 | Filet of Chicken with Cucumbers
41 – 5 | Jellied Partridge
46 – 50 | Ortolans – songbirds fattened on grain, drowned in Armagnac, and roasted whole
51 – 53 | Poularde Demi-Deuil – Chicken in white sauce with truffle
54 – 55 | Pureed Pheasant
56 – 60 | Quail with Mirepoix – onions, carrots and celery
61 – 65 | Quenelles – chicken dumplings in cream sauce
66 – 70 | Rabbit Cutlets
71 – 76 | Sautéed Breast of Partridge
77 – 82 | Sautéed Pheasant
83 – 87 | Sliced Breast of Duck with Sour Orange Sauce
88 – 89 | Sliced Grouse
90 – 95 | Small Birds in Aspic – heads and feet left on
96 – 98 | Thrushes on Bread with Cheese
99 – 100 | Turkey Hachis – chopped turkey, with lemon and parsley

Roasts and Main Dishes (d100)

1 – 3 | Beef Ribs
4 – 3 | Boeuf à la Mode – larded beef braised and served in a sauce made form the braising liquid.
7 – 3 | Boiled Boar’s Head
10 – 12 | Boiled Calf’s Head
13 – 15 | Boiled Ham
16 – 18 | Broiled Beef Steaks
19 – 21 | Broiled Lamb Steaks
22 – 24 | Calf’s Head à la Suprise – boned and stuffed with forcemeat and eggs.
25 – 27 | Fricandeau of Veal – veal larded and braised, glazed with a rich sauce
28 – 30 | Glazed Breast of Veal on a Bed of Peas
31 – 33 | Pike au Souvenir – stuffed with a forcemeat of various fishes and herbs.
34 – 36 | Pike Fricandeau – larded with bacon and served with a brown sauce
37 – 39 | Pike in Court Bouilloin – served in a spiced wine and butter sauce
40 – 42 | Pike with Lemon and Egg Sauce
43 – 45 | Pike with Wine Sauce
46 – 48 | Roasted Beef with Sweetbreads
49 – 51 | Roasted Chicken with Truffles
52 – 54 | Roasted Duck
55 – 57 | Roasted Goose with Orange Sauce
58 – 60 | Roasted Ham
61 – 63 | Roasted Joint of Beef
64 – 66| Roast Joint of Venison
67 – 69 | Roasted Leg of Lamb
70 – 72 | Roasted Partridges with Bread Sauce
73 – 75 | Roasted Pheasant with Bread Sauce
76 – 78 | Roasted Squabs
79 – 81 | Roasted Turkey with Oyster Sauce
82 – 84 | Roasted Woodcock
85 – 87 | Whole Roast Suckling Pig
88 – 90 | Whole Roast Lamb
91 – 93 | Whole Roasted Sturgeon
94 – 100 | Whole Salmon – poached in wine

Sauces (d20)

1 | Allemande – chicken stock thickened with a roux, with egg yolks and cream.
2 | Anglaise – thickened stock with egg yolks and anchovy butter
3 | Béchamel – thickened cream sauce
4 | Chasseur – brown sauce with mushrooms, shallots, and herbs
5 | Devil – mustard sauce with stock, shallots and wine
6 | English Bread Sauce – made with bread soaked in milk and melted butter, flavored with onion, pepper, and sweet spices
7 | Espagnole – thickened brown sauce of beef and veal stock
8 | Godard – demi-glace flavored with ham, champagne and mushrooms
9 | Hollandaise – butter sauce thickened with egg yolks and flavored with lemon
10 | Madeira Sauce
11 | Mayonnaise
12 | Meat Gravy
13 | Poivrade Sauce – thickened stock highly seasoned with pepper
14 | Régence – thickened stock flavored with ham, onion, and wine.
15 | Rémoulade – mayonnaise with herbs and gherkins
16 | Russian Sauce – thickened stock flavored with herbs, mustard, and lemon juice
17 | Sarladaise Sauce – an emulsion of cream and egg yolks with chopped truffles
18 | Sauce Robert – sauce of onions, demi-glace and mustard
19 | Velouté – sauce of thickened veal or chicken stock
20 | Verjuice – cream and egg-enriched chicken stock, thickened and made tart with grape juice

Vegetables and Salads (d100)

1 – 4 | Asparagus – served on toast
5 – 8 | Asparagus à la Polonaise – with parsley, chopped egg, and breadcrumbs
10 – 11 | Boiled Artichoke – served with pots of melted butter
12 – 13 | Braised Cabbage
14 – 15 | Braised Endive
16 – 17 | Braised Leeks
18 – 19 | Broccoli in Butter
20 – 21 | Buttered Cauliflower – on a bed of greens
22 – 23 | Cabbage in Butter
24 – 25 | Cauliflower in Cheese Sauce
26 – 27 | Cauliflower in Cream Sauce
28 – 29 | Cauliflower with Mayonnaise
30 – 31 | Celery à la Crême – celery served in a cream sauce
32 – 33 | Cos Lettuce Leaves
34 – 35 | Cucumber Salad
36 – 37 | Curly Chicory Salad
38 – 45 | French Beans with Butter
46 – 47 | Fried Battered Cardoons
48 – 49| Fried Celery
50 – 51 | Jerusalem Artichokes in Cream Sauce
52 – 53 | Mixed Field Greens
54 – 60 | Peas in Butter
62 – 63 | Peas with Butter and Mint
64 – 65 | Pickled Cucumbers
66 – 67 | Pickled French Beans
68 – 69 | Pickled Green Almonds
70 – 71 | Pickled Lemons
72 – 73 | Pickled Mushrooms
74 – 75 | Pickled Red Cabbage
76 – 77 | Puree of Cauliflower
78 – 79 | Puree of Parsnips
80 – 81 | Puree of Potato
82 – 83| Puree of Turnips
84 – 85 | Radish Salad
86 – 87 | Red Cabbage with Chestnuts
88– 89 | Scalloped Potatoes
90 – 91 | Steamed Purple Cauliflower
92 – 93 | Stewed Cardoons
94 – 95 | Stewed Mushrooms
96 – 97| Stewed Mixed Root Vegetables
98 – 100 | Stewed Spinach

Entremets (d100)

1 – 2 | Almond Cake
3 – 4 | Apple Tart
5 – 6 | Artichoke Bottoms with Whole Egg Yolks and Butter
7 – 8 | Beef Roulade or Cold Beef Pie (Great Britain)
9 – 10 | Blancmange
11 – 12 | Butter Cake
13 – 14 | Cheese Tarts
15 – 16 | Cherry Tart
17 – 18 | Cheshire Cheese
19 – 20 | Chicken Chaud-Froid – Chicken breasts covered with a jellied cream sauce, served cold
21 – 22 | Cold Sliced Tongue
23 – 24 | Edam Cheese
25 – 26 | Eggs and Vegetables in Aspic
27 – 28 | English Cheddar
29 – 30| English Flummery – thickened, sweetened starch set in a mold
31 – 32| Fondue
33 – 34 | Fried Calf’s Liver
35 – 36 | Fruit Cake
37 – 38 | Gorgonzola Cheese
39 – 40 | Gouda Cheese
41 – 42 | Gruyere Cheese
43 – 44 | Lemon Cakes
45 – 46 | Macaroni Pie
47 – 48 | Macaroni with Butter and Cheese
49 – 50 | Mimolette Cheese
51 – 52 | Mushrooms in Pastry
53 – 54 | Neufchâtel Cheese
55 | Omelette du Curé – with tuna, and carp roe
56 – 57 | Omelette with Asparagus
58 | Omelette with Cheese
59 | Omelette with Chicken Liver
60 | Omelette with Herbs
61 – 62 | Omelette with Mushrooms
63 – 64 | Omelette with Truffles
65 – 66 | Orange Cakes
67 – 68 | Parmesan Cheese
68 – 70 | Poached Eggs on a Bed of Spinach
71 – 72 | Poached Eggs on Toast
73 – 74 | Pound Cake
75 – 76 | Roquefort Cheese
77 – 78| Scrambled Eggs with Truffles
79 – 80| Stilton Cheese
81 – 82| Soufflé
83 – 84 | Sponge Cake
85 – 86 | Sweet Omelette (with fruit)
87 – 88 | Toasted Bread with Slices of Ham
89 – 90 | Veal and Ham Rissoles – fried croquettes served with white sauce
91 – 92 | Venison Pie
93 – 94 | Vol-au-Vents – puff pastries filled with chicken and mushrooms
95– 96 | Warm Brie
97 – 98 | Welsh Rarebit
99 – 100 | White Cake with Sugar Icing

Desserts (d100)

1 – 2 | Apples
3 – 4 | Apples in Pastry
5 – 6 | Apricot Ice Cream
7 – 8 | Apricots in Brandy
9 – 10 | Butter Biscuits
11 – 12 | Candied Almonds
13 – 14 | Candied Cherries
15 – 16 | Candied Chestnuts
17 – 18 | Candied Violets
19 – 20 | Cheesecake
21 – 22 | Chocolate Creams – in individual glasses
23 – 24 | Crème Anglaise (custard) – served in individual glasses
25 – 26 | Crème Brûlée
27 – 28 | Dried Figs
29 – 30 | English Syllabubs – wine and sweetened cream mixed and left to separate, served in individual glasses that display the layers.
31 – 32 | Fairy Butter – egg yolks, butter and sugar flavored with orange flower water and put through a sieve
33 – 34 | Fruit Ices in Various Flavors
35 – 36 | Gooseberries
37 – 38 | Île Flottante (Floating Island)– Mounds of flavored meringue in custard
39 – 40 | Lemon Creams – in individual glasses
41 – 42 | Macarons – biscuits of meringue and ground almonds.
43 – 44 | Madeleines – small sponge cakes baked in shell-shaped molds
45 – 46 | Marzipan Fruits in Assorted Shapes
47 – 48 | Mille-feuille – layers of crisp flat pastry alternating with layers of fruit jam, topped with white sugar icing
49 – 50 | Nectarines
51 – 52 | Orange Creams – in individual glasses
53 – 54 | Oranges
55 – 56 | Pears in wine
57 – 58 | Pistachio Creams – in individual glasses
59 – 60 | Pistachio Nuts
61 – 62 | Plums
63 – 64 | Pots de Crème – individual baked custards
65 – 66 | Pralines – almonds covered in in hard caramelized sugar
67 – 68 | Profiteroles – cream puffs
69 – 76 | Puits d’Amour (Wells of Love) – cylindrical puff-pastry cases filled with redcurrent or raspberry jelly, and glazed with caramel. These have very naughty connotations.
77 – 78 | Raspberry Creams – in individual glasses
79 – 80 | Ribbon Creams – different flavors of cream, layered in individual glasses, with colored sweetmeats separating the layers.
81 – 82 | Small Glazed Cakes in Assorted Colors
83 – 84 | Snow Balls – baked cored apples filled with marmalade, inside a pastry shell, and covered with white sugar icing.
85 – 86 | Spanish Cream – flavored with rosewater, in individual glasses
87 – 88 | Strawberries and Cream
89 – 90 | Strawberry Ice Cream
91 – 92 | Tarte Conversation – puff pasty shells filled with almond cream, covered with hard sugar icing.
93 – 94 | Trifle – liquor-soaked macaroons topped with flavored cream.
95 – 96 | Vanilla Ice Cream with Honey
97 – 98 | Walnuts
99 – 100 | White Nougat

The lists can also be used to represent the menus at the restaurants of post-revolutionary France. A more extensive treatment of aristocratic dining in the Ghastly Age will appear in the upcoming “Ghastly Companion to High Society”.

Character Inspirations Part IV: The Mad Scientist

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The so-called “Mad Scientist” has long been a defining character in Gothic stories. Although the archetype is often considered to have entered the genre with the titular character of Shelley’s “Frankenstein”, there were already a pair of mad (and utterly depraved) doctors in de Sade’s “Justine”. The historical, literary, and cinematic inspirations that follow are generally focused around the Ghastly Age (1765 – 1820), with some notable exceptions whose prominence mandates their inclusion. Even if you don’t play the Ghastly Affair RPG, the lists might proved useful for inspiring Mad Scientist-type characters in your favorite Horror, Steampunk, or Victorian-era game.

Some Historical Mad Scientists:
Charles Babbage
Johann Bessler (Orffyreus)
Henry Cavendish
Armand-Marie-Jacques de Chastenet, Marquis of Puységur
James Cox
Andrew Crosse
Honoré Fragonard
Franz Joseph Gall
Wolfgang von Kempelen
Dr. Robert Knox
Ada Lovelace
Franz Mesmer
Sir Isaac Newton
James Price
Joseph Priestly
Charles Redheffer
Count Saint-Germain
Nikola Tesla

Some Literary Inspirations:
Coppelius (The Sandman – E.T.A. Hoffmann)
Victor Frankenstein (Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus – Mary Shelley)
Doctor Henry Jekyll (Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde – Robert Louis Stevenson)
Doctor Moreau (The Island of Doctor Moreau – H.G. Wells)
Doctor Rodin (Justine; or, the Misfortunes of Virtue – Marquis de Sade)
Doctor Rombeau (Justine; or, the Misfortunes of Virtue – Marquis de Sade)
Crawford Tillinghast (From Beyond – H.P. Lovecraft)
Herbert West (Herbert West – Reanimator – H.P. Lovecraft)
Willy Wonka (Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl)

Some Mad Scientists from Movies and Television:
Ichabod Crane (Sleepy Hollow – 1999 Movie)
Heinrich von Frankenstein (Frankenstein – 1931 Movie)
Dr. Moreau (Island of Lost Souls)
Will Plunkett (Plunkett and Macleane) [ Multi-Classed Mad Scientist / Bandit]
Doctor Pretorius (Bride of Frankenstein)
Dr. Thomas Rock (The Doctor and the Devils)
John Seward (Bram Stoker’s Dracula) [Seward is not a Mad Scientist in Stoker’s novel, but qualifies as portrayed in Coppola’s film]
Dr. Frank-N-Furter (The Rocky Horror Picture Show) [ Multi-Classed Mad Scientist / Libertine]
Rotwang (Metropolis)

A Few Inspirational Songs:
Am I Going Insane – Black Sabbath
Brain Damage – Pink Floyd
Diary of a Madman – Ozzy Osbourne
Flight of Icarus – Iron Maiden
Frankenstein – The Edgar Winter Group
Frayed Ends of Sanity – Metallica
Funtime – Iggy Pop (Covered by Peter Murphy as Fun Time)
Happy House – Siouxsie and the Banshees
I’m Going Slightly Mad – Queen
Living Dissection – Cannibal Corpse [Warning: disturbing image follows link]
No One Knows My Plan – They Might Be Giants
She Blinded Me With Science – Thomas Dolby
Spiral Architect – Black Sabbath
They’re Coming to Take Me Away, Ha-Haaa! – Napoleon XIV
Weird Science – Oingo Boingo
Welcome to My Nightmare – Alice Cooper

Gallery of Images
1 Accum at Surrey Institution

2 Franz Joseph Gall examining the head of a pretty young girl, Wellcome V0011119

3 "Le Baquet de Mesmer" Wellcome M0006352

4 An Experiment on a Bird in an Air Pump by Joseph Wright of Derby, 1768

5 An international system of electro-therapeutics - for students, general practitioners, and specialists (1894) (14596130718)

6 Frankenstein, pg 7

7 Homunculus Faust

8 An aged anatomist selecting his dissection instrument whilst Wellcome M0008887

9 Giovanni Aldini, galvanism experiments Wellcome L0007024

The Treatment of Mental Illness in the Ghastly Age

The late 18th century saw rapid scientific and technological progress, resulting in the beginning of the Industrial Revolution in Great Britain. Sadly, the treatment of the mentally ill remained generally abysmal. Despite the work of Philippe Pinel in France (who pioneered compassionate care of the mentally ill), in most of Europe the “mad” were imprisoned, chained, beaten, and abused – or simply starved and neglected. As mentioned in the “Ghastly Affair Player’s Manual”, the mentally ill were sometimes even displayed for money by the asylums that housed them. In 1788, King George III received the best treatment available in the England at the time for his mental illness – he was alternately locked in a straitjacket, purged withe emetics, made to swallow mercury, tied to a chair, had his skin blistered, and was locked in a cold room – when he wasn’t being made to do manual labor. Because doctors had little idea about the underlying causes of mental disorders, treatments for those deemed insane could also include bleeding, enemas, verbal abuse, and regular beatings. King George’s treatment was a country garden party compared to the horrible fate that awaited those sent to London’s infamous Bethlem Hospital, better known as Bedlam. There many patients were kept naked and chained by their necks to metal poles, in the unheated cells of a dilapidated building.


Credit for Images 2,3,8, & 9 : Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org . Images 2,3,8, & 9 are copyrighted works available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

The Ghastly Affair Presenter’s Manual Reviewed on YouTube

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Talking About Games” has posted a new review of the “Ghastly Affair Presenter’s Manual (Illustrated PDF Version). Thank you “Talking About Games” for another great review!

A New Review and an Actual Play Recording for the Ghastly Affair RPG!

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The “Talking About Games” channel on YouTube has just posted an in-depth review of the Illustrated PDF Version of the “Ghastly Affair Player’s Manual”. Thank you, “Talking About Games”, for the great review!


Elsewhere on YouTube is the recent recording of “No Belle of the Ball”, a Ghastly Affair game played by members of the Facebook Tabletop RPG One Shot Group. A salute to all the members of the group who continue to support Ghastly Affair!

20 Mysterious Strangers at the Door

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Death knocks at the doors of both the poor and the rich. Pen Wellcome V0042153

If there is a front door in a Gothic story, eventually a mysterious stranger is going to knock on it! If you need some help thinking up a new way to make a character’s life complicated, just have one of the following people show up at their home.

On the other side of the door is… (d20)

  1. A lovely young woman who claims to have been the victim of a carriage (or other) accident. She is oddly listless during the day, but becomes much more vivacious after nightfall. Any young people in the house will begin to fall ill soon after.
  2. A single-minded, heavily armed man dressed in black. He asks about another man he describes as having a cadaverous complexion, blood-shot eyes and red-stained lips. The inquirer insists that if he told you why he needs to find the man, you would not believe it.
  3. A desperate man (or woman) in dirty clothes, fleeing from the police (or thief-takers).
  4. A footman dressed in an antique livery, bearing a letter that invites you (and your guests) to a party at a long-abandoned château.
  5. A group of masked revelers who insist they’ve been invited to a ball at this address.
  6. A group of men dressed in medieval armor. They will not lift their visors, but in an archaic dialect they insist on the right of hospitality.
  7. An extremely pale man dressed in elegant clothes, who claims to have shocking news that you must sit down to hear. He will not come inside without your express invitation, however.
  8. A mature-looking man who always wears a hat pulled low on his head. He tells stories of far-off lands and times long ago. Eventually, he asks if anyone present desires immortality.
  9. A raven that speaks, but only says a single word that seems to mock a recent loss suffered by the listener. The raven could actually be a Zoomorphic Revenant, a transformed Fairy, or even a tormenting Imp.
  10. Death, politely stating he has an appointment with someone in the house.
  11. A young man who claims to have no memories of who he is, and says he has been held captive in a cellar as long as he can remember. He bears a letter, which directs the reader to send the young man to join a military unit.
  12. A woman in an exotic outfit, speaking a strange language you have never heard before. If given paper and ink she will draw a map of an unknown island, and point to it.
  13. A group of Gypsies who offer to do whatever repairs, gardening work, and animal care you might need. If that offer is refused, the women will offer to tell the fortunes of everyone in the household. If that offer is also refused, the oldest Gypsy woman will warn of the doom that awaits the uncharitable.
  14. A man offering to buy the property at an absurdly inflated price. He won’t take no for an answer.
  15. A man selling property insurance. He claims to have been treated rudely at a previous address, where a man (who showed the obvious sign of laudanum addiction) was impatient to get rid of him.
  16. A young couple who give obviously false names, and want a place to stay. Both are dressed simply. They say they have just married, but while the young woman has aristocratic manners and speech, her supposed husband is obviously lower class. If they stay they will eventually be heard to whisper such phrases as “I think we’re safe now, there’s no way they will find us here”, and “Remember, we both promised to do whatever it took not to go back to that awful place”. The Presenter can vary the actual genders of the two people as desired, of course.
  17. An enormous man, well over seven feet tall, who hides his face under a hood. He speaks with a deep, resonant voice and an aristocratic accent. Only his hands are visible, and they seem bony and jaundiced, with skin that is extremely dry and weathered-looking. He is looking for a Swiss chemist who may have passed through these parts.
  18. An emaciated man begging for alms. He looks so thin it is hard to believe he is still alive. If he is given money or food, the food stores of the house will inexplicably multiply. If he is refused, all the food and drink in the house will immediately spoil.
  19. A pretty young woman who wants a place to stay. Her speech is oddly monotone, and her movements jerky. While her complexion is perfect, her skin seems oddly pale and almost waxen. She refuses to sit or stand close to the fireplace. She must be wearing some kind of watch, because a faint ticking sound can be heard coming from her.
  20. A lawyer bearing the deed to a castle, left to you by a relative you have never heard of. No one can remember hearing the sound of a carriage approaching. There is no carriage outside. When the man leaves, he will walk down the road and seem to disappear behind a tree (or another house). The deed is legally valid.

Image Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org Death knocks at the doors of both the poor and the rich. Pen and ink drawing. Published: –

Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Now Available on DriveThruRPG and RPGNow: The Ghastly Affair Presenter’s Manual!

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The “Ghastly Affair Presenter’s Manual” is now available in an Illustrated PDF Version on DriveThruRPG and RPGNow! The new PDF includes all the advice, creatures, historical information and alternate rules of the print version, in a screen-optimized layout designed for usability. Like the Illustrated PDF Version of the Player’s Manual, the Presenter’s Manual is fully bookmarked, indexed, and extensively hyperlinked. Plus, it includes the full-page Stacey Kaelin illustrations from the print version.

 
Now you can have both Ghastly Affair rule books in illustrated PDF!
Purchase on DriveThuRPG
Purchase on RPGNow