The Bogeymen of Panzoasia, Part I – Orcs

Tags

, , , , , , , , , ,


Orcdoodledark1

The Orcs of Panzoasia

The Orcs of Panzoasia’s Ultimate West are best known for their obsession with mass production, and flagrant wastefulness. Their culture places no value on workmanship or artistry, valuing quantity over quality. Orcs go into battle with wagons filled with large quantities of cheap iron throwing axes, and other disposable weapons. Orcish clothing is mass-produced, and poorly made – but the average Orc has piles of it. Orcs live in (and underneath) stark, boxlike factory-forts of plain brick (which are usually in disrepair), surrounded by enormous mounds of garbage – and thick clouds of smoke. Sometimes the garbage mounds around a factory-fort become so large that they become essentially defensive walls – complete with gates. Above all, Orcs never repair what they can just replace. When an environment gets too polluted even for them, they simply move on to a new one.

The Appearance and Costume of Orcs

A typical male Orc resembles a human in overall body shape, but with a boar’s head, and skin covered in bristly, dark hair everywhere except the belly (which can be quite pronounced in older and high-status Orcs). Female Orcs, on the other hand, are nearly hairless, with sow-like heads, and bodies that are otherwise practically identical to Human women in every respect.

Basic clothing for a male Orc consists of a leather bib apron with pockets, and leather pants (preferably Human hide). Orcish females, on the other hand, wear sleeveless smock dresses of printed cloth. Orcish women are not allowed to wear footwear of any kind when indoors. All Orcish clothing and armor noticeably features the sign of the factory-fort where it was produced. As with everything else they own, Orcs never clean or repair their clothing, but throw it on the garbage pile when it becomes unwearable.

Orcish females are expected to wear heavy facial makeup that looks quite garish to Human eyes, and as much cheap, showy jewelry as they possibly can. The mates of high-status Orcs may actually wear real gold and jewels stolen from the Five Peoples (or purchased from the Hobgoblins), but lower status Orcish women usually just have mass-produced items of ceramic or lead, painted gold or silver, and accented by glass “gems”.

Male Orcs are socially expected to wear as many weapons as they can carry – most of which are purely for show, or so cheaply made as to almost useless. Their leather boots tend to fall apart quickly – like everything else that comes out of Orcish factories.

Every Orc has several brands on their body. Soon after their birth, an Orc is branded with the sign of their clan, the sign of their factory-fortress, and sign designating their social class. Once they reach adulthood, male Orcs are branded with the sign of their profession. Female Orcs are further branded with the sign of their father, and later, the sign of their mate.

Orcish Culture and Society

Orcs conduct constant raids for raw materials, and to waste weapons and armor (so more will have to be made). Most of all, the Orcs wage war to take slaves. Halfling slaves are particularly desired for their nimble fingers. Orcish practice is to work their factory slaves until they die, and replace them with new ones. Orcs also operate mines – particularly coal and iron – for which they also prefer to use bound labor. The garbage dumps around the Orcish fortress-factories are another source of slaves, since Halflings (and also Kobolds) find them irresistibly rich sources of repurposable objects.

Orcish society is extremely patriarchal and hierarchical. Orcish women are regarded as the property of males, and any male feels free to treat his “sows” in any manner he pleases. Naturally, Orcish males practice polygyny, and will purchase as many wives as they can afford. While Orcish mothers sometimes show real love for their children, their mates believe that the more whippings an “orclet’ suffers, the better adult they’ll make. Lower class Orcs are routinely abused by their “Bosses”, who are in turn subservient to the “Barons” and “Captains” who own the factory-forts. The Orcish Engineers who know how to build and maintain the factory machinery form a separate, hereditary caste.

All male Orcs are considered employees of their factory-fort, and are paid in worthless wooden tokens that can only be spent at the factory store. Theoretically, an Orc could redeem their tokens for actual coins from the treasury, but in practice any Orc that tries to do so will be taken behind the factory-fort and beaten by the owner’s personal bodyguard of goons. The only actual coins a low-status Orc will own is what they have stolen in raids, and managed to keep hidden from their Boss. The economic ideal of Orcs is Autarky, where every factory-fort is completely self-sufficient (one day making ceramic pots, another other forging axes), and Orcs have no trade outside their strictly-controlled borders.

Orcish dwellings are extremely cluttered inside, crammed with factory-made objects, and some better-quality items stolen in raids. Unlike Dragons, however, Orcs do not attach any real sentimental value to these objects, and regularly dispose of them to make room for new ones. Art objects made by other races are hoarded by high-status Orcs, but are regarded purely as status symbols.

Until they reach the age of maturity at nine, an Orc’s name is just a number designating their birth order and father’s name. For example, a young Orc might be named “Seventh of Skullhammer”. An adult Orc uses a name conferred on them by the owner of their factory-fort. Orcs of high-status or well-like fathers may be given names like “Brightsteel” or “Wolfblood”. The children of low-status or disliked fathers will be saddled with names like “Scumbucket” or “Rottenmouth”. Rebel Orcs who have fled the factory-forts, on the other hand, often eschew speaking Orcish, and might adopt new names in Western Common.

Orcish cuisine consist of two dishes – Slop and Barbeque. Orcish Slop, which is always prepared by females, consist of all the flesh, bones, entrails, vegetables, and seasonings on hand, hacked up, thrown into a big iron pot, and boiled. Orcish Barbeque, always cooked (and only consumed) by males, consists of whatever animals or people the Orcs captured on a raid, slow cooked (possibly alive) by a smokey fire. They especially love to roast Human babies on spits.

Orcs have a single sport – Faceball. Every factory-fort also has a Faceball team. A Faceball field is one hundred paces in length, and at either end is a prisoner tied to a post. A ball made from a skinned and stuffed Human, Elven, or Dwarven head is place in the middle of the field. Each team of nine Orcs runs from their own end of the field to acquire the ball. The goal is to hit the other team’s prisoner in the face with the ball (which scores 3 points), or else hit their body (scoring one point). The ball can be kicked, thrown, or carried. Any and all means, short of murder, may be used to acquire the ball from the opposing team. Once a goal is scored, the ball is placed again the center of the field, and the process is repeated twenty or more times until one team is the clear winner. Disputes about scoring are settled by each team appointing a “Puncher”. The two Punchers trade blows to the face, and the decision goes to the team whose Puncher endures the longest. Faceball games regularly devolve into deadly brawls involving both players and spectators,

Dead Orcs are disposed of in whatever way is convenient at the time. Often, they are simply thrown into one of the piles of garbage around the factory-fort (where all other kinds of waste are also flung). Eating the dead is not out of the question, particularly during hard times.

Contrary to popular stories, Orc males find the thought of touching a “flat-faced”, non-Orcish woman disgusting. Female Orcs, on the other hand, are often attracted to sufficiently strong and hairsute men of Human and Dwarven descent.

Many young Orcs rebel against their brutal society, and Orcish females in particular resent the abuse they suffer from their mates. There are said to be entire settlements of these runaway and rebel Orcs, who have acclimated themselves to the bright light of day. Rumors persist that the women in these settlements have somehow acquired potions allowing them to assume Human form, and have children by Human or Dwarven fathers. It is further said that many of rebel Orcs have even embraced the Chaotic and Good Alignments, and plan to one day reform all of Orcish society along egalitarian lines.

Orcs at War

Typical Orcish armor consist of a battle apron of leather riveted with metal plates, studded leather gauntlets, and stiff leather boots. They use square shields of metal-bound wood, that frequently splinter and break. Leaders will occasionally have better armor of Hobgoblin make. Orcs generally prefer hacking weapons, such as axes, falchions, and bardiches, or else two-handed mauls resembling sledgehammers. Their favorite weapon of all is a large cleaver similar to a carcass splitter.

Orcs tend to attack in massive frontal assaults intended to overwhelm enemies with relentless brutality.

Animals and Allies of the Orcs

Orcs employ Giant Boars as battle steeds, and are the only race that manage them. They also raise slobbering, pug-faced Orcdogs for use in war, and as guards. Other animals are raised (under inhumane, factory-like conditions) by the Orcs’ slaves. Orcs may also hoard animals that other races consider valuable. Orcs often purchase the services of Ogre and Troll guards, and the factory owners sometimes bring in Hobgoblins as military trainers (despite the fact that Hobgoblins despise Orcs). Orcs sometimes ally with Devil Swine, and the most brutal Wereboars. Boreynes often choose to dwell near Orcs, and may run along with them on raids. The Boreynes may even decide to attack invaders obviously intended to harm “their” Orcs.

The Orcish Language

Orcish is an extremely vulgar language, and Orcs speaking other languages will always pepper their speech with obscenities. There is actually no way to be polite in Orcish – the only tones possible are groveling submission or contemptuous disregard. Orcish is written with exactly the same Runes used for Dwarven. Dwarves tend to get offended and very angry when confronted with this fact.

The Alignment and Religion of Orcs

The Gnomish sages claim that in the days when the Wasteland was still green, Orcs were predominantly Neutral worshipers of Life and fertility who lived in forest caves. Then, their culture became increasingly Lawful, as they discovered mass-production. In fact, many Orcs are actually still Lawful, and only support their twisted culture because it is “The Traditional Orcish Way” (even though it wasn’t always). Evil, however, has infected every aspect of modern Orcish life. The average Orc will usually repay mercy with brutality, and kindness with sadistic cruelty. There may still be some hope for Orcish society, it is distant and faint.

Like most Bogeymen, “pure” Orcs cannot cast Spells, or perform Miracles. However, every Orcish factory-fort includes a chapel to the powers of Darkness, staffed by one or more Human (or Half-Orc) Depradators. Keeping the Orcs devoted to Evil is said to be a top priority for the Antichurch of Darkness, and having served in a mission among the Orcs is fast-track to the upper echelons of leadership among the Clerics of Evil. Besides worshiping the Lord and Lady of Darkness, Orcs often pay homage to the Evil Immortal Ishannakael, who led them into the lands of modern Maeland during the Reign of the Monsters.

Half-Orcs

The Half-Orcs sometimes born to Orcish mothers resemble either thickly built Humans with narrow eyes and large mouths, or else tall Dwarves. Males will have prolific body hair. Their skin color is the same as their Human or Dwarven father. They usually have a “piggish” noses, large teeth, and slightly pointed ears, although about 1 in 10 could pass for a “pure” Human or Dwarf upon casual observation.

Half Orcs can follow the same Character Classes as Humans or Dwarves. If they follow a Human Class, one of their Class’s Special Abilities will be replaced by “Infravision”. As mentioned above, they often become Depradator priests and priestesses. They are also sometimes found among the ranks of Thieves in the largest cities. If they are not Evil, they tend to be Chaotic – since the Friends of Chance are the only other religious community that freely welcomes them.

The most well-known Half-Orc of all was Strax Meat, the famous Beserker who was actually son of a Human Ranger and the runaway daughter of an Orcish Captain. While feared for his incredible strength, and the ruthless skill with which he wielded his famous cleaver, he also had a playful side – and was also known for his kindness towards children.

A Concise Cleric

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


Here’s a concisely-presented version of the revised Cleric Class I posted last week. This presentation eliminates much of the flavor text specific to the Panzoasia setting (especially the 9th and 14th Level Destinies). This entire block of characteristics could be printed on the flip side of a character sheet for easy reference.

CLERIC

A militant religious warrior granted special abilities by the Divine Powers.

Ability Rolls: Str: 1d10+8 | Int: 3d6 | Wis: 1d8+10 | Dex: 3d6 | Con: 3d6 | Cha: 3d6

Hit Dice: d8 per Level, until 9th. Add 3 Hit Points per Level thereafter.

To-Hit-AC 0 [Attack Bonus]: 19 [+0]

Improves by 1 point at 2nd, 4th 6th, 8th, 10th, 12th, and 14th Level.

Saving Throws: Death-13 | Wands-14 | Paralysis-15 | Breath Weapon-16 | Spells-12.

Target numbers decrease by 1 point at 2nd, 4th 6th, 8th, 10th, 12, and 14th Level.

Alignment: Lawful, Chaotic, or Good. Player Character Clerics may not be Evil.

Starting Age: 20+d4

Starting Language(s): Western Common. (+Alignment Language if used)

Armor and Weapon Familiarity: Cleric can identify all common arms and weapons, and can discern quality and materials with an Intelligence Check. Can use any armor, and any weapons not prohibited according to Alignment. (See Prohibited Weapons below).

Heal an Ally: Cleric can restore Hit Points equal to own Experience Level. Usable a number of times per day equal to the Cleric’s Experience Level.

  • Example: 3rd Level Cleric heals 3hp per use, up to three times a day.

Recipient must have have lost Hit Points fighting by by Cleric’s side.

Perform Miracles: Total Levels worth per day equal to Cleric’s Experience Level minus 1.

  • Example: a 6th Level Cleric can perform a total of 5 Levels worth of Miracles per day.

Maximum Level of Miracle allowed is equal to half Experience Level of Cleric.

  • Example: a 6th Level Cleric can only perform 1st, 2nd, or 3rd Level Miracles.

Cleric can perform any Miracle on the list of Clerical Miracles (up to maximum Level allowed) without prior preparation, but cannot perform the same Miracle more than once per day.

Cleric must be at be at least 2nd Experience Level to Perform Miracles.

Religious Knowledge: Cleric automatically recalls facts regarding own Alignment and religion (including Planar Spirits of own Alignment). Can make Intelligence Check to recall similar knowledge relating to other Alignments, religions, and their Planar Spirits.

Turn Undead: Wisdom Check to overcome 2HD worth of Undead per Cleric’s Experience Level.

  • Example: A 4th Level Cleric can try to Turn a total of 8 HD worth of Undead per attempt.

Lawful Clerics make Undead cower, Chaotic Clerics make them confused, Good Clerics make them flee, and Evil Clerics can command them. Effect lasts 1 Round per Cleric’s Experience Level. Undead with 4 or less HD than Cleric must Save versus Spells or be destroyed. At 10th Level, Cleric can affect Planar Spirits of other Alignments.

Prohibited Weapons: If Lawful, cannot use missile weapons or poison. If Chaotic, all weapons must be based on tools with other uses (spiked clubs, hammers, etc). If Good, cannot use edged weapons or poison. If Evil, cannot use blunt weapons.

Spiritual Obligations: Must always zealously follow own Alignment, fight the opposite Alignment, seek to convert others, and obey superiors in Clerical organization.

Experience Point Requirements per Level (or Minimum Hours Played):
2nd: 2,250 (12 hours) | 3rd: 5,000 (24 hours) | 4th: 9,000 (36 hours) | 5th: 16,000 (48 hours) | 6th : 30,000 (60 hours) | 7th: 60,000 (72 hours) | 8th: 120,000 (84 hours) | 9th: 220,000 (96 hours) | 10th: 300,000 (108 hours) | 11th: 420,000 (120 hours) | 12th: 540,000 (132 hours) | 13th:: 660,000 (144 hours) | 14th: : 780,000 (156 hours)

An Alternate B/X Cleric

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


Redon mystical-knight

This version of the B/X Cleric Class emphasizes the difference between ordinary priests and priestesses, who generally cannot perform miracles, and the kind of militant zealots who adventure and fight monsters. Like the other “Panzoasian” classes I’ve posted recently, this one is built on a framework of “Five Special Abilities + Two Restrictions/Weaknesses”.

Notable difference from the standard B/X Cleric include:

  • Strength and Wisdom rolled differently from other Abilities.
  • Five-point Alignment as a default.
  • Hit Points are rolled with a d8 rather than d6, to better accord with the Cleric’s status as a religious warrior.
  • Healing has been partially separated from the ability to perform other miracles.
  • More versatility in magic and an expanded spell list, but fewer spells usable per day.
  • A streamlined Turn Undead ability.
  • Restrictions on weapons are keyed to Alignment.
  • More emphasis on the Cleric being a member of a militant organization, with all that implies.

Human Cleric

Abilities: Str: 1d10+8 | Int: 3d6 | Wis: 1d8+10 | Dex: 3d6 | Con: 3d6 | Cha: 3d6
Special Abilities: Armor and Weapon Familiarity, Heal an Ally, Perform Miracles, Religious Knowledge, Turn Undead.
Restrictions and Weaknesses: Prohibited Weapons, Spiritual Obligations.
Hit Dice: d8 per Level, until 9th. Add 3 Hit Points per Level thereafter.
Alignment: Lawful, Chaotic, or Good. Player Character Clerics may not be Evil. There are no Neutral Clerics – Druids are the equivalent of Clerics for the Congregation of Life.
Starting Age: 20+d4
Starting Language(s): Western Common.

Typical Starting Equipment:

  • Chain Mail Armor.
  • Mace (or Spiked Club, if Chaotic).
  • Shield (painted with the emblem of the Cleric’s religion).
  • Boots.
  • Holy Symbol (on chain around neck).
  • Holy Book (“The Classic of Destiny” [Lawful], “The Aphorisms of Chance” [Chaotic], or “The Gospels of Light” [Good]).
  • Backpack.
  • 1 robe (in the sacred color or colors of your Alignment and religion).
  • 1 vial of Holy Water.
  • Aspergillum (for sprinkling Holy Water).
  • Portable triptych shrine (book-sized).
  • Devotional candle.
  • Phylactery, beaded necklace, or devotional scapular.
  • Lantern.
  • 1 pint of oil for lamp.
  • Linen bandages.
  • Sponge.
  • 1 Wineskin (filled with wine).
  • 1 week of rations (dried sausage, hard cheese, hardtack bread, and dried apples).
  • 1d12 gp

Your character is one of the adventuring Human clergy who has taken up arms to advance and defend their beliefs. Although they are also a fully ordained official of their religion, your Cleric’s martial training distinguishes them from the mass of non-adventuring Priests and Priestesses who generally officiate over worship in villages, towns, and cities. Generally, only Humans are so fanatically devoted that they become militant, adventuring Clerics.

Even adventurers who are not of your character’s Alignment will welcome their assistance – especially their supernatural ability to heal allies. Additionally, your character is prepared like no other person to face the horrors of the Undead that lurk in the dark places of Panzoasia. As they gain experience, your character also becomes capable of performing wondrous miracles. On top of that, they are a capable warrior – albeit not quite as skilled as a dedicated Fighter.

When you choose your Cleric’s Alignment you are also choosing the religion they serve. The details of each religion’s terminology, iconography and worship vary somewhat across the four great Regions of Panzoasia (Ultimate West, Ultimate North, Ultimate South, and Ultimate East), but their philosophical orientations and essential moral teachings are consistent everywhere. Your character should always be preaching the truth of your Alignment and religion, and seeking new converts. (See below for an overview of the five Religions of the Ultimate West.)

In the Ultimate West, the Lawful-Aligned Clerics of Destiny and the Good-Aligned Clerics of Light have long been allied, but that alliance is now beginning to fray. Many Good Clerics believe the Assembly of Destiny has come under the influence of Evil – either unwittingly, or in a secret compact to impose absolute order on Panzoasia. Conversely, many Lawful Clerics see the Church of Light as disturbingly tolerant of the Chaotic-Aligned Friends of Chance, and much too sympathetic to Chaotic ideas about social equality and reform. That split is becoming especially pronounced in the Republic of Bythebia, where half the Senate of Gold Dragons has proclaimed its unwavering support for the Church of Light, and the other half has declared the Assembly of Destiny to be the one true way.

Special Abilities of Human Clerics

Armor and Weapon Familiarity: Not only does your character know how to properly employ most common types of armor and weapons (excluding those Prohibited to them on account of their Alignment), but you can also roll an Intelligence Check for them to:

  • Identify the materials from which armor or weapons are made, and know what special properties the item may have as a result.
  • Appraise the quality and value of armor or weapons.
  • Know whether a weapon is Enchanted (but not the quality of the enchantment).
  • Identify strange or exotic armor and weapons.

Heal an Ally: Your character can heal the wounds of those who have fought by their side.

  • A Cleric can Heal an Ally as as many times a day as their Experience Level.
  • Each time your character uses this power, they can restore as many Hit Points as their own Experience Level.
  • An “ally” does not have to be of the Cleric’s own Alignment, but must have incurred their wounds fighting alongside the Cleric against common enemies.
  • Your character can also eventually Perform Miracles that will heal even more effectively, or allow them to heal ordinary people.

Perform Miracles: Once your character achieves 2nd Level the Divine Powers they serve will grant them the ability to Perform Miracles beyond simply healing their allies.

  • Your Character can choose to perform any Miracle from the list of Clerical Miracles, of a Maximum Level indicated in the Human Cleric Advancement Table. For example, a 6th Level Cleric can perform 1st, 2nd, or 3rd Level Miracles, but not 4th, 5th, 6th, or 7th Level ones.
  • A Cleric cannot perform the same Miracle more than once per day, however.
  • The Total Levels of Miracles a Cleric can perform per day is equal to their Experience Level, minus 1. (as indicated on the Human Cleric Advancement Table).
  • For example: a 7th Level Cleric can perform six Levels worth of Miracles per day. That could be: six different 1st level Miracles; or a 2nd Level Miracle and four different 1st Level ones; or two different 2nd Level Miracles and two different 1st Level ones.

Religious Knowledge: Your character is completely familiar with the doctrines, symbolism, and practices of their own Alignment and religion, and can recall them without the need for any Ability Check.

  • You can roll an Intelligence Check to see if your character recalls the doctrines, symbols, or practices of another Alignment and religion
  • A successful Intelligence Check also allow your character to correctly identify Planar Spirits or Undead.

Turn Undead: Whenever your character encounters one or more Undead, you can roll a Wisdom Check. Success means that one or more of the creatures will succumb to the power of your character’s Faith, with effects varying by the Cleric’s Alignment and Level.

  • The total HD of Undead creatures affected is equal to twice your character’s Experience Level, and the effect lasts for one Round per Experience Level. A mixed company of creatures will be individually affected in order of their Hit Dice – from lowest to highest.
  • If a Cleric is Lawful, they rebuke the Undead – causing the creatures to cower helplessly before the Cosmic Order.
  • If a Cleric is is Chaotic, they confuse the Undead – causing the creatures to wander aimlessly and harmlessly.
  • If a Cleric is Good, they repulse the Undead – causing the creatures to flee.
  • Evil NPC Clerics command the Undead, causing them to fall under the Cleric’s control.
  • If a Cleric has 4 or more HD than any Undead creature(s) they have Turned, the creature(s) must also Save versus Spells or be destroyed – either becoming inanimate, ripping themselves apart, or else disintegrating.
  • At 10th Level, your character can use their power to Turn against Planar Spirits with Hit Dice equal to, or less than, the Cleric’s own Experience Level – as if the beings were Undead creatures. A Cleric cannot Turn Planar Spirits of their own Alignment, however.

Restrictions and Weaknesses of Human Clerics

Prohibited Weapons: Depending on their Alignment, your character is prohibited from using certain kinds of weapons.

  • Lawful Clerics cannot use missile weapons, such as bows, slings, or flaming oil. The use of poison is especially forbidden.
  • Chaotic Clerics cannot use any weapon that has no other practical use, or which cannot be made by re-purposing ordinary objects. Such things as axes, knives, spears, clubs, spiked clubs, hammers, and sickles are all acceptable, but not two-handed swords, crossbows, or halberds. However, Chaotic Clerics are encouraged to use (and have been instructed in the proper handling of) flaming oil, and other thrown incendiaries.
  • Good Clerics cannot use edged weapons designed to shed blood, such as swords or axes. They can never use poison of any kind.
  • Evil Clerics (Depradators) must only use edged weapons, and are strongly encouraged to poison their blades whenever possible. In fact, the blades used by Depradators are often wavy or serrated, in order to maximize bloodshed.

Spiritual Obligations: Your character has obligations both to the Divine Powers they serve, and to their Clerical Order.

  • A Cleric must zealously uphold the tenets of their Alignment with a fidelity not expected of ordinary people, and must always try to convert others away from the other Alignments.
  • A Cleric must always strive against the Alignment opposite to their own – wherever, and whenever, possible.
  • A Cleric must obey commands from their superiors in your Order, and must not break their vows regarding Prohibited Weapons (or your marital status).
  • Even if your character is Chaotic, they still belong to a network of Brethren who insist that they respect the opinions of more experienced members, and expect them to put “The Cause” before their own interests.
  • If your character fails to live up to their Spiritual Obligations, they will first be warned by a Planar Spirit sent by the Divine Powers they serve. If they persists in their sins, they may be stripped of their abilities to Heal an Ally, Perform Miracles, and Turn Undead.

Destiny at 9th Level

Your character may petition their Clerical Order (or Brethren, if they are Chaotic) to help them build a stronghold. If the Order agrees, they will pay half the cost of construction, and send 20+d20 1st Level Clerics to garrison it.

Destiny at 14th Level

The current Patriarch or Matriarch of your character’s Clerical Order (or Brethren, if they are Chaotic) will die, be slain, or set out to attain Immortality shortly after your character achieves 14th Level. The remaining Superiors will then ask your character to become the new leader.

Human Cleric Advancement Table

Exp. Points (Hours played)

Exp. Level

Hit Points

Level Title

THAC0 [Attack Roll Bonus]

Max. Level of Miracle

Total Levels of Miracles per Day

Undead Turned per Attempt

0

1

1d8

Missionary

19 [0]

2 HD

2,250 (12 hours)

2

2d8

Militant

18 [+1 ]

1st

1

4 HD

5,000 (24 hours)

3

3d8

Zealot

18 [+1]

1st

2

6 HD

9,000 (36 hours)

4

4d8

Holy Warrior (or Unholy Warrior)

17 [+2]

2nd

3

8 HD

16,000 (48 hours)

5

5d8

Evangel (or Dark Evangel)

17 [+2]

2nd

4

10 HD

30,000 (60 hours)

6

6d8

Partisan

16 [+3]

3rd

5

12 HD

60,000 (72 hours)

7

7d8

Defender (or Dark Avenger)

16 [+3]

3rd

6

14 HD

120,000 (84 hours)

8

8d8

Apostle

15 [+4]

4th

7

16 HD

220,000 (96 hours)

9

9d8

Father Superior / Mother Superior

15 [+4]

4th

8

18 HD

300,000 (108 hours)

10

9d8+2

Father Superior / Mother Superior

14 [+5]

5th

9

20 HD

420,000 (120 hours)

11

9d8+4

Father Superior / Mother Superior

14 [+5]

5th

10

22 HD

540,000 (132 hours)

12

9d8+6

Father Superior / Mother Superior

13 [+6]

6th

11

24 HD

660,000 (144 hours)

13

9d8+8

Father Superior / Mother Superior

13 [+6]

6th

12

26 HD

780,000 (156 hours)

14

9d8+10

Patriarch / Matriarch

12 [+7]

7th

13

28 HD

Human Cleric Saving Throws

Level

Poison / Death Ray / Disease

Wands / Psionics

Paralysis / Petrification

Dragon Breath / Explosives / Firearms

Spell /Staff / Rod

1

13

14

15

16

12

2 – 3

12

13

14

15

11

4 – 5

11

12

13

14

10

6 – 7

10

11

12

13

9

8 – 9

9

10

11

12

8

10 –11

8

9

10

11

7

12 – 13

7

8

9

10

6

14

6

7

8

9

5

The Religion of Law in the Ultimate West

Divine Patrons: The Lord and Lady of Destiny.

Holy Symbol: The Wheel of Law.

Sacred Colors: Dark Blue, Gray, Violet.

Most Sacred Place: The Grand Temple of Destiny, located in the city of Caestus in Bythebia.

In the Ultimate West, the religion of Law is the Assembly of Destiny, which also runs most schools. It’s adventuring Clerics are called Ordained Judges, and their battles against the forces of Chaos have brought them both fame and infamy. They bring final justice to lawbreakers, oppose the unregulated use of magic (especially Illusionism), and kill Monsters they believe to be abominations contrary to the Natural Order. Non-adventuring Priests and Priestesss of Destiny, on the other hand, conduct numerous and intricate rites at their local Temple, educate children, and are often formally empowered to judge civil and criminal cases in their locality. Along with the (Good-aligned) Church of Light, the Assembly of Destiny enjoys much state patronage.

The Religion of Chaos in the Ultimate West

Divine Patrons: The Lord and Lady of Chance.

Holy Symbol: The Swirling Star.

Sacred Colors: Motley and Mixed Colors.

Most Sacred Place: The Citadel of Chaos, completely encompassing an island in the Gulf of Maeland.

The religion of Chaos in the Ultimate West is called the Friends of Chance, whose members also refer to themselves as The Free Brethren. The adventuring Clerics of Chaos are called Chaotes, and they tirelessly oppose every kind of restriction on personal freedom – even those imposed with benevolent intentions. The Chaotes have a very loose structure, and wear no special clothing. The Friends of Chance come together informally, either in hidden Safe Houses, or secluded areas outdoors. Worship begins with the consumption of intoxicants and playing of improvised music. Every ordinary devotee (or “Fellow Traveler”) present is free to dress as they will, and to dance, sing, or speak their mind as the spirit moves them. One or more Chaotes may, or may not, be present.

Chaotes tend to be especially fervent against the demonic cult of Evil Chaos, which they regard as a vile perversion that turns the message of freedom into a means of enslavement.

The Religion of Good in the Ultimate West

Divine Patrons: The Lord and Lady of Light.

Holy Symbol: The Anchor of Hope.

Sacred Colors: White, Saffron, Green.

Most Sacred Place: The Holy Mountain on the Isle of Albelon.

In the Ultimate West, the religion of Good is called the Church of Light, and its militant human Clerics (and Paladins) roam far and wide in their battles against Evil. Every adventuring cleric of Good belongs to an Order named after one of the Immortal Heroes or Heroines of Panzoasia. A male adventuring Cleric of the Church of Light is called a Warrior Monk or Canon, and puts the title “Brother” before his name. A female Cleric who adventures is called a Warrior Nun or Canoness, and puts “Sister” before her name. The non-adventuring Priest and Priestess who conduct worship in a local Church, on the other hand, are addressed as “Father” and “Mother”. Adventuring Clerics of Light may not marry (but are not necessarily expected to remain chaste). Non-adventuring Priests and Priestesses may marry – but not each other. The Church of Light enjoys the official patronage of most governments.

The Religion of Evil in the Ultimate West

Divine Patrons: The Lord and Lady of Darkness.

Unholy Symbol: The Inverted Pentagram.

Unholy Colors: Black, Deep Purple, Crimson Red.

Most Unholy Place: The Basilica of Eternal Darkness, on the Cursed Island of Nerolan.

The religion of Evil in the Ultimate West is the Antichurch of Darkness, whose militant Human Clerics are the Depradators. Ideally, the vile rites at an Antichurch are performed by a Depradator Priest and Depradator Priestess together. However, since the clergy of Darkness have a pronounced tendency to assassinate each other, it is not unusual for only one or the other to be officiate alone! The Depradators were actually the first militant Clerics – Lawful, Chaotic, and Good Clerics arose to fight them during the Reign of the Monsters. The ceremonies of Darkness include admonitions to spite the other four Alignments by deliberately breaking laws, enslaving others, harming the innocent, and despoiling nature. Often, worship will be directed not towards the Lord and Lady of Darkness directly, but rather at some other Infernal power or Evil Immortal .

The Religion of Neutrality in the Ultimate West

Divine Patrons: The Lord and Lady of Life.

Holy Symbol: The many-branched Tree of Life.

Sacred Colors: Green, Red, Brown, and undyed cloth.

Most Sacred Place: The Isle of Testing, off the coast of Maeland.

The Congregation of Life is the religion of Neutral-aligned Westerners. Once the predominant faith of Humans, it has receded in importance since the Reign of the Monsters, as the more extreme Alignments gain adherents. The worship of Life is conducted either at the remaining Stone Circles, around sacred trees (which may also be within rings of stones), atop verdant hills, or at the centers of holy Labyrinths. The regular, non-adventuring Priests and Priestesses of Life are usually married couples (or at least lovers), who regularly perform the Great Rite together to ensure the fertility of the crops. Services for the mass of worshipers are usually joyous and festive, involving much costumed dancing, singing, and feasting – but also the sacrifice of food and animals (which are always eaten afterward).  Lawful clergy often condemn the religious rites of Life as “primitive” and “immoral”, and are known to use coercive tactics to convert Neutrals. The Neutral Alignment has no militant Clerics of its own, but rather the ancient order of Druids serves as its protectors and champions.


Clerical Miracles of Panzoasia

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


This variant list of Clerical Miracles expands the “Spells” available to B/X clerics across seven Levels. and includes some effects from my “Ghastly Affair” RPG. Each Miracle is defined as concisely as possible, for speedy adjudication during play.

As with the list of Magic User and Elven Warrior-Wizard Spells, each Level of Miracles has an even number of entries, to facilitate randomly-determined effects. Note that “Spells” such as “Light” and “Darkness” are here considered separate, and not reversible forms of each other (as in the standard B/X rules). One important aspect of the Panzoasia setting is that the ordinary priests and priestesses that conduct most religious ceremonies cannot effect Miracles under ordinary circumstances. Only Lawful, Chaotic, Good, and Evil Human militants that have Levels in the Cleric Class are so gifted by the Divine Powers. (It’s a major theme of the setting that fanatical devotion to one’s Alignment is the path to Immortality and power – and that the perpetual conflicts perpetuated by Immortality-seeking Paragons of Law, Chaos, Good, and Evil may ultimately bring the world to ruin.

Except where otherwise indicated, each Miracle is assumed to take 1 Round to create, during which the caster can do nothing else.

Where necessary, the description of each Miracle is followed by one, two, or two additional terms defining the affected area of the spell, it’s duration, and how the Spell if affected by a successful Saving Throw.

  • If no [affected area] is indicated in brackets, a spell affects 1 target in visible range.
  • If no {duration} is indicated in curly brackets, a spell lasts 1 hour.
  • If no *Save effect is indicates after an asterisk, the spell does not allow a Saving Throw.

1st Level Clerical Miracles

1

Banish Vermin: All vermin (rats, roaches, bedbugs, flies, worms, ticks, etc.) of normal size within a 25′ foot radius are forced to flee. {Until dawn}

2

Cause Fear: One Victim within 50’ is overwhelmed with Fear, and will seek to flee anyone who is aggressive towards them. {1 Turn} *Save negates

3

Cause Light Wounds: Cleric inflicts 1 point of Damage per Level or HD (if a creature) of the Victim. For example: A 3rd Level target loses 3 Hit Points. [1 touched victim] There is no Saving throw.

4

Cure Light Wounds: Recipient is cured of 1 point of Damage per own Character Level (or HD if a creature). For example: A 3rd Level Recipient regains 3 lost Hit Points. [1 touched Recipient other than the Cleric]

5

Darkness: All light within a 50 foot radius is extinguished, creating total and impenetrable darkness that clouds even normal Infravision. Only Infravision allows sight. Darkness dispels Light. {1 Hour}

6

Detect Evil: Cleric can detect the presence and location of Evil creatures and objects within a 25′ foot radius. {1 hour} *Intelligent beings with Levels in a PC Class can save to avoid detection.

7

Detect Magic: Cleric will know if any aspect of their immediate environment is magical. [50’ radius] {Until Cleric moves from Affected Area}

8

Detect Poison: Cleric can detect the presence and location of poison within a 25′ foot radius. {1 hour}

9

Detect Snares & Pits: Cleric is aware of any intentionally set traps, snares, and pits within 50’ of their current location, however carefully hidden. {Until User leaves area}

10

Detect Undead: Cleric can detect the presence and number of any Undead creatures in visual range – even if hidden, Invisible, or Ethereal. {1 hour}

11

Discover Dead: The Cleric can sense all dead bodies with 50’, even if hidden or buried. Corporeal Undead (such as Ghouls) are detected, but not incorporeal one (like Wraiths). {1 hour}

12

Light: Either a touched object, or the air itself, sheds light that brightly illuminates a 50′ radius. Light dispels Darkness. {1 Hour}

13

Protection From Evil: Cleric or Recipient gains +2 to AC and Saves against Evil, Summoned, or Conjured beings, and cannot be physically touched or mentally dominated by such entities. [1 person] {1 hour}

14

Protection From Serpents: Snakes of any size are unable to touch or attack the Cleric, or a touched Recipient. {1 hour}

15

Purify Food and Drink: Decayed, spoiled or contaminated food and drink become safe, wholesome and nutritious. [1 Human meal’s worth per Cleric’s Level]

16

Putrefy Food and Drink: Wholesome or nutritious food and drink become rotten, wormy and disgusting. [1 Human meal’s worth per Cleric’s Level]

17

Remove Fear: All Fear effects, mundane or magical, are removed from the Recipient. [1 person]

18

Resist Cold: Recipient can ignore HP damage from cold equal to 2 x Cleric’s Experience Level. {1 hour}

19

Resist Fire: Recipient can ignore HP damage from fire equal to 2 x Cleric’s Experience Level. {1 hour}

20

Sanctuary: Anyone attempting to target the User (or the specified Recipient) with an attack or Spell must Save to continue. [1 Turn]

2nd Level Clerical Miracles

1

Attract Lover: The Recipient will meet a temporarily devoted lover of the desired gender, at the next possible opportunity. The lover will leave at the next full moon, no matter how the Recipient pleads.

2

Augury: If they make a successful Wisdom Check, Cleric knows whether a particular action to be taken by themselves (or another) is likely to result in harm or benefit (or both) within the next day. Can only be used once per question.

3

Barrenness: Victim becomes completely unable to produce offspring. {Permanent} * Save negates if undesired.

4

Consecrate Object: An object or substance becomes sacred to the Cleric’s Alignment. Planar Spirits and Undead of the Alignment opposite to the Cleric’s can be struck by a Consecrated Object as with a regularly enchanted Magic Weapon, and boldly presenting one causes them to check Morale. Consecrated (Holy) water or oil inflicts 1d8 damage on opposite-Alignment Spirits or Undead. {Until desecrated}

5

Cure Paralysis: The Recipient is cured of all paralyzing or movement inhibiting effects (except Petrification). [1 touched Recipient]

6

Delay Poison: Any poison affecting the Recipient is temporarily neutralized, but will take effect once the Miracle ends. Can also be performed on a person before they are exposed to poison. {1 Turn per Cleric’s Level}

7

Fertility: The next time the touched Recipient can possibly conceive offspring (or impregnate another), it will happen. [1 person] *Save negates, if undesired.

8

Know Alignment: Cleric learns a target’s actual Alignment. [1 Recipient in visual range] *Save negates.

9

Lesser Restoration: An Ability reduced by damage or magic is restored by 1 point. [1 touched Recipient]

10

Speak With Animals: Cleric can speak to any normal or giant animals encountered, who can communicate to the limits of their Intelligence. Monsters with bizarre anatomies (such as Owlbears) are excluded. [1 hour]

3rd Level Clerical Miracles

1

Blind/Deafen: Cleric makes the Victim either blind or deaf, with all appropriate Penalties. [1 Recipient within 50’] {Until next new moon}

2

Cause Serious Wounds: Cleric inflicts 1d4 points of Damage per Exp. Level or HD (if a creature) of the Victim. For example: A 5th Level target loses 5d4 Hit Points. [1 touched victim]. *Save negates.

3

Cure Blindness/Deafness: Recipient is cured or either Blindness or Deafness, magical or mundane in origin. [1 touched Recipient other than the Cleric]

4

Cure Disease: Recipient is cured of all physical diseases and parasitic infections. [1 Recipient not the Cleric]

5

Cure Serious Wounds: Recipient is cured of 1d4 points of Damage per their own Exp. Level or Hit Dice. For example: A 5th Level Recipient regains 5d4 lost Hit Points. [1 touched Recipient other than the Cleric]

6

Curse: Cleric inflicts a negative magical condition upon the Victim. Typical Curses include: -4 on one Ability; -3 on all Attack rolls; or -1 on all Saves. {1 day per Cleric Level} *Save negates.

7

Hold Person: Cleric paralyzes a humanoid target under 5 HD, locking them into their current position. Victim can breathe, but take no other action. [1 hour] *Save negates.

8

Inflict Disease: Cleric inflicts a mundane disease of some some kind upon a visible Victim. {Until cured} *Save negates, and forces Cleric to Save or contract the disease!

9

Locate Object: Cleric knows the location of a desired type of object that can be potentially reached within an hour’s time. A specific item can be located only if the Cleric is familiar with it. An object encased in lead, aluminum, or tin cannot be found with this spell (but items made of those metals can be).

10

Monstrous Offspring: The Cleric curses the next child of the Victim (male or female) to be born a Monster (with no more HD than the Cleric has Levels). Monster is born with 1 HD, and gains an additional HD every month until it reaches its final amount. *Save negates.

11

Remove Curse: Recipient is freed from any supernatural curses currently afflicting them. A “curse” is defined by any Spell which includes the word “curse” in its description. [1 Recipient other than the Cleric]

12

Speak With Dead: Cleric can gain knowledge from an inanimate corpse, including anything it knew while alive. 1 question can be asked for every 2 Levels of the Cleric. Answers will be as curt as possible. This spell only be cast once per corpse. [1 corpse] {1 hour}

4th Level Clerical Miracles

1

Animate Dead: Cleric transforms corpses into controlled Skeletons or Zombies with total HD equal to the Cleric’s. The Undead created will obey every command in the most literal manner possible. The Cleric can only maintain as many HD of Skeletons or Zombies as their own Level. {Permanent}

2

Consecrate Location: A location becomes specially consecrated to the Cleric’s Alignment. Planar Spirits of the opposite Alignment cannot enter the Consecrated location at all. Undead not of the Cleric’s alignment must make a Morale check every Round to stay within. Locations can be desecrated by another Cleric deliberating performing acts of the opposite Alignment in them. [1 building or plot of land no bigger than a an acre] {Permanent until desecrated}

3

Create Food and Water: Bland but nourishing food suddenly appears, along with drinkable water. [1 meal per Level of Cleric] {Until food rots naturally}

4

Create Water: Drinkable water is created inside a non-living container, or on a non-living object. Water cannot be made to manifest inside a living being. [1 gallon per Cleric Level]

5

Curse of Lycanthropy: Cleric curses the Victim to become a Lycanthrope, starting on the next Full Moon. The Cleric specifies the type of Lycanthrope. [1 victim within 25’] {Permanent until curse is lifted}

6

Curse of Undeath: Cleric curses the Victim to rise again as an Undead Monster after their death, of a type with the same HD as their Experience Level before they died. The Monster is not controlled by the Cleric. [1 victim within 25’] {Permanent until curse is lifted}

7

Dispel Magic: Ongoing spell effects are ended. There is a chance of failure equal to 5% x the Level of Spell to be undone (i.e., Dispelling a 5th Level Spell is 25% likely to fail).

8

Magic Circle: Cleric physically marks out a magical boundary that cannot be crossed, touched, or affected in any way by Planar Spirits or Undead. All within enjoy Protection from Evil (as the 1st level spell). [1 circle or polygon up to 10’ in diameter]{Until effaced, crossed, or dispelled by Cleric}

9

Neutralize Poison: All poisons and toxins affecting the Recipient are neutralized. Can also be performed on a person before they are exposed to poison. [1 Recipient other than the Paladin]{1 Turn per Cleric’s Level}

10

Rain of Frogs: A large quantity of real, living frogs fall from the sky or ceiling. All witnesses under 5 HD must Save or stare dumbfounded (and unable to attack) for 6 Rounds. Dumbfounded creatures take 1 hp of damage per Round from falling frogs. [150’ radius around Cleric] {1 Minute}

11

Speak With Plants: Cleric can question the local plants about actions that have transpired near them within the last season. Plants can only answer “Yes” or “No”, and can only sense events apparent to any ordinary observer with no magical senses. [1 Hour]

12

Walk On Water: Cleric or Recipient can walk across water (or any similar fluid, including mud and quicksand) as if it was dry ground. All encumbrance rules still apply. [1 hour]

5th Level Clerical Miracles

1

Blacken Sky: The sky for a ½ mile radius overhead turns as black as a starless night. Creatures damaged or deterred by sunlight can function normally under a Blackened Sky. {1 hour}

2

Cause Critical Wounds: Cleric inflicts 1d6 points of Damage per Experience Level or Hit Dice (if a creature) of the Victim. For example: A 9th Level target loses 9d6 Hit Points. [1 touched victim] *Save negates.

3

Commune With Spirit (Divination): Caster mentally contacts a Planar Spirit (Angel, Demon, Devil, Fairy, Archon, Daimon, Elemental, or Genie) or incorporeal Undead of their own Alignment, and asks it one question about a topic within its area of expertise. If a Reaction Roll indicates the Spirit likes the Caster, (or they are already friends) it will answer truthfully (to the best of its knowledge). {1 question}

4

Cure Critical Wounds: Recipient is cured of 1d6 points of Damage per own Experience Level or Hit Dice. For example: A 9th Level Recipient regains 9d6 lost Hit Points. [1 touched Recipient other than the Cleric]

5

Death Ward: Recipient cannot be harmed by offensive Spells (or Maledictions) for the duration of the effect, and is immune to XP loss or Ability damage from contact with the Undead. [Cleric, or 1 touched Recipient] {Until dawn}

6

Exorcism: All supernatural creatures must flee, and all Spells from Evil sources immediately end. Any Planar Spirits or incorporeal Undead inhabiting living creatures are forced out and Banished to their home Plane (or Plane of final rest). [A 25’ radius] *Save negates

7

Flame Strike: A roaring column of flame descends and inflicts 8d6 points of fire damage to everything in a targeted area. [A 25’ radius within visual range] *Save halves damage.

8

Infest Wounds: Cleric causes horrible worms and crawling insects to erupt from the Victim’s wounds for days. Victim must already be wounded, and will suffer as follows for the duration:

  1. Victim cannot cast spells.
  2. Victim cannot sleep, suffering 1d4 points of damage per sleepless day past the 2nd.
  3. Victim will be unable to naturally heal (but can still be healed naturally).
  4. Victim will smell so terribly that anyone within 5’ must Save versus Poison to do anything but vomit.

Effect is ended by magically healing victim’s wounds, or by Remove Curse, Cure Disease, or Dispel Magic.

[1 previously wounded Victim within visual range] {1 day per Cleric’s Level} *Save negates.

9

Insect Plague: Cleric summons a swarm of locusts (or other destructive vermin) that covers a full acre of land. All edible plants within are consumed, visibility is 5’, and creatures under 2 HD flee. {1 hour}

10

Rain of Blood: A large quantity of real blood falls from the sky or ceiling. All non-Evil creatures under 5 HD must Save or flee the area in fear. All movement is reduced by half, and those attempting to move in the affected area must make a Dexterity Check or fall down. Predatory monsters are attracted to the blood. Vampires receive +1 hp per HD. [150’ radius around Cleric] {1 minute}

11

Rain of Flesh: A large quantity of raw, bloody meat falls from the sky or ceiling. All non-Evil creatures under 5 HD must Save or flee the area in fear. All in the affected area (except Cleric) take 1 hp damage per Round from falling meat. Predatory monsters with 1 mile are attracted. Non-intelligent carnivores will stop any other actions to consume the meat. [150’ radius around caster] {1 minute}

12

Raise Dead: Cleric restores life to a creature of their own Alignment who has been dead no more than 3 days. *Save negates, if creature does not wish to return.

6th Level Clerical Miracles

1

Animate Objects: The Cleric brings to apparent life up to 4 small objects (the size of stools or figurines), 2 medium-sized objects (the size of chairs or human-sized statues), or 1 large object (the size of a clothes press, or equestrian statue).

  • Metal object have AC 2[17], wooden ones have AC 6[13], and stone ones are AC 4[15].
  • Small objects have 1 HD, and hurl themselves for 1d4 points of damage.
  • Medium objects have 3 HD, and strike for 1d6 damage.
  • Large objects have 5 HD, and hit for 1d8 damage.

{1 hour}

2

Barrier: Caster creates a wall of whirling metal balls (or slashing blades) anywhere within 50’. Anyone contacting the Barrier takes 11d6 damage. [A 50’ x 50’ wall, or 25’ diameter ring 20’ high] {1 hour} No Save.

3

Call Animal Allies: Cleric summons endemic animals totaling no more than 10 HD, which will willingly perform one simple service lasting no more than an hour.

4

Conjure Aerial Servant: The Cleric summons an Aerial Servant and commands it to retrieve one object or creature weighing up to 500lbs from a specified location. If the Aerial Servant cannot complete its task in its allotted time, it will return and attack the Cleric. {1 Day per Cleric Level or until target is retrieved}

5

Dismissal (Evocation): Cleric forces a single Planar Spirit to return to its place of origin. [1 Spirit with no more HD than the Cleric] {Until next New Moon} *Save negates

6

Find the Path: For the next hour the Cleric knows exactly how to get to one desired location, including how to bypass any secret door, traps, or other hazards along the way. The Cleric is completely unable to communicate knowledge of the correct path (except to lead and let others follow), and can only explain how to bypass dangers as they are encountered (but before anyone would be hurt). {1 hour}.

7

Part Water: A body of water up to 1000’ long and 100’ deep is parted down to its bed. The parting is 10’ wide, and bounded by vertical walls of water. [1 hour, but can be ended by Cleric before]

8

Quest: Cleric forces the Victim to perform a task or mission, which can be dangerous, but not suicidal. This miracle can also be used to undo a Quest imposed by another Cleric. {1 task or mission lasting no more a year}. *Save negates.

9

True Seeing (Divination): Cleric sees things exactly as they are, or were before they being affected by any Spells or Special Abilities that produce illusions, Glamours, or Transmutations. [Visual range] {1 hour}

10

Word of Recall: The Cleric, and one additional Recipient per Level, are brought back to a predetermined temple or holy place of the Cleric’s religion. If no such place has been designated, they are transported to the nearest one.

7th Level Clerical Miracles

1

Complete Healing: The Recipient is healed of all lost Hit Points. [1 touched Recipient other than the Cleric]

2

Earthquake: The Cleric cause severe tremors to strike the land in a 200’ foot radius around them. The spot where the Cleric stands is safe, but everywhere else in that area small buildings and defensive walls will be leveled, and larger buildings will be made uninhabitable. 1 in 6 creatures must Save versus Death or be crushed to death inside one of the rifts that open in the ground . {1 Turn} *Save prevents crushing death.

3

Holy Word: All beings of the Alignment opposite to the Cleric’s within 50’ are affected as follows:

  • Up to 5th Level (or 5 HD): Killed instantly.
  • 6th to 8th Level (or 6 to 8 HD): Stunned for 2d10 Turns, and 6d6 damage.
  • 9th to 12th Level (or 9 to 12 HD): Deafened for 1d6 Turns, and 3d6 damage.
  • 13th Level (or 13 GD) + : Stunned for 1d10 Round, and 1d6 Damage.

[50’ radius, ignoring solid barriers] There is no Saving Throw against any of the effects.

4

Raise or Calm Storm: The Cleric either creates a violent storm of a type appropriate to the climate and location (a blizzard during the winter months in a temperate climate, a sandstorm in a hot desert, etc.), or calms such a storm already occurring. [10 mile radius] {Until dawn}

5

Regeneration: The Recipient regrows all lost or mangled body parts or organs – including severed limbs, lost eyes, lost teeth, and any other member that has been cut off or permanently damaged. All scars and bodily mutilations are erased. [1 touched Recipient other than the Cleric]

6

Restoration: All Experience Point loss and Ability Damage suffered by the Recipient for any reason will be restored. [1 touched Recipient other than the Cleric]

7

Resurrection: The Cleric can restore any creature of any Alignment to full life, as long as a single bone remains intact. If the Resurrected being is intelligent, but not already of the Cleric’s Alignment, they must agree to convert on the spot or fall down dead again.

8

Summon Spirit Ally (Evocation): Cleric causes the appearance of a Spirit of their own Alignment (Lawful Archon, Chaotic Daimon, Good Angel, Evil Devil or Demon, or a noncorporeal Undead), with no more Hit Dice than their own. The Ally will willingly fight the Cleric’s current opponents until either they are all dead, have all surrendered, or the Spirit’s material form is destroyed. The Cleric must specify the type of being they desire. A specific Spirit can be Summoned, if the Cleric knows their name. The Ally may afterward impose a task or quest upon the Cleric in payment.

9

Supreme Miracle: Cleric implore the Divine Powers to grant them a miracle of supreme power which can: (A) mimic any other Spell from any Class’s list, (B) undo the effects of any other Spell, (C) bestow a Soul upon a soulless being, (D) create any Monster, (E) change a creature’s Alignment, (F) find or restore to existence a lost or destroyed object or being, or (G) erase up to the last hour of history, re-living it with the Cleric’s knowledge intact. Every time a Cleric receives a Supreme Miracle, they are required to sacrifice a quarter of their wealth and treasure to the Divine Powers they serve. *Save as mimicked spell. Save negates Alignment change.

10

Travel the Spiritual Worlds: The Cleric (and 1 companion per Level) travel(s) physically to one of the Supernal Worlds (Heaven, the Celestial Spheres, or the Empyrean) or one of the Infernal Worlds (Limbo, Hell, or The Outer Darkness). The Miracle must performed again to return home. {1 trip per use}

Truck Stops of the Uncanny Highway

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


Heaven and Hell meet in the truck stops of the Uncanny Highway – sometimes, literally. During the “Groovy Age” of the 1960s and 1970s, American truck stops were generally smaller – and more numerous – than the massive ones to be found on highways today. The road-weary trucker could pull in to get gas, have their rig weighed, get repairs done, have a meal, take a shower, rest in the lounge room, rent a bed, do laundry, clean their truck, buy supplies – and possibly indulge their vices.

“Groovy Age” truck stops constituted a demimonde largely hidden from the eyes of non-truckers, and the following tables can set up some extremely dark and gritty scenarios. Naturally, you should edit the results to reflect the comfort level of your group.

Truck Stop Theme

d20

The overall design of the main building is…

1

Tiki.

2

Space-Age “Googie”.

3

Old West Boomtown.

4

faux adobe.

5

a rustic log cabin.

6

Art Deco chrome.

7

a faux castle.

8

faux Chinese.

9 – 10

plain brick, and in good repair.

11 – 12

plain brick, and in a state of disrepair.

13 – 14

plain clapboard, and in good repair.

15 – 16

plain clapboard, and in a state of disrepair.

17 – 18

stucco-faced brick, and in good repair.

19 – 20

stucco-faced brick, and in a state of disrepair.

The Parking Lot

d20

The parking lot is built for…

1 – 2

10 rigs

3 – 4

15 rigs

5 – 6

20 rigs

7 – 8

25 rigs

9 – 10

30 rigs

11 – 12

35 rigs

13

40 rigs

14

50 rigs

15

55 rigs

16

60 rigs

17

65 rigs

18

70 rigs

19

75 rigs

20

80 rigs

d12

and is currently occupied..

1

10%

2

20%

3

30%

4

40%

5 – 8

50%

9

60%

10

70%

11

80%

12

90%

d20

Besides trucks, the other cars in the lot include…

1 – 2

a motorcycle.

3

a “chopper” motorcycle.

4

a highway patrol car.

5

a highway patrol motorcycle.

6

a decorated “Hippie Van”.

7

a rock band’s Tour Bus.

8

a 2-door coupe.

9

a Camper Van or Motorhome

10

an El Camino.

12

a plain white van with blacked-out windows.

13

a family station wagon.

14

a plain four-door sedan.

15

a 1950s model Cadillac Eldorado – with big rear fins.

16

a sporty convertible.

17

a muscle car.

18

a Volkswagen Beetle.

19

a European sportscar.

20

a pickup truck.

There is a 50% chance per hour spent (sleeping or idling) in the Parking Lot that a “Lot Lizard” (prostitute) will knock on the car (or truck) door.

Truck Cargoes

d100

This rig is hauling…

1 – 2

Auto Parts.

3 – 4

Beef.

5 – 6

Beer.

7 – 8

Bicycles.

9 – 10

Birdseed.

11 – 12

Books and Magazines.

13 – 14

Cameras & Film Equipment.

15 – 16

Cars.

17 – 18

Chicken.

19 – 20

Children’s Clothing.

21 – 22

Cigarettes and Tobacco.

23 – 24

Distilled Spirits & Liquors.

25 – 26

Flour.

27 – 28

Frozen Foods

29 – 30

Fruits and Vegetables.

31 – 32

Furniture.

33 – 34

Gasoline.

35 – 36

Guns

37 – 38

Hazardous Chemicals.

39 – 40

Heating Oil.

41 – 42

Household Cleaners.

43 – 44

Lawn Supplies.

45 – 46

LP Records and 8-Tracks.

47 – 48

Lumber.

49 – 50

Makeup & Beauty Supplies.

51 –52

Men’s Clothing

53 – 54

Motorcycles.

55 – 56

Movie Reels.

57 – 58

Non-hazardous Chemicals.

59 – 60

Nuts.

61 – 62

Orange Juice.

63 – 64

Paint.

65 – 66

Pharmaceuticals.

67 – 68

Plumbing Fixtures.

69 – 70

Pork Products.

71 – 72

Record Players and Radios.

73 – 74

Salt.

75 – 76

Snack Foods.

77 – 78

Televisions.

79 – 80

Toilet Paper and other Paper Products.

81 – 82

Tools & Hardware.

83 – 84

Toys and Novelties.

85 – 86

Wine.

87 – 88

Women’s Clothing.

89 – 90

Gravel or Asphalt.

91 – 92

Batteries.

93 – 95

Illegal Drugs. (Roll again to determine cover cargo, ignoring results above 92.)

96– 97

Illegal immigrants. (Roll again to determine cover cargo, ignoring results above 92.)

98

1d6 kidnapped young women being sold into sex slavery. (Roll again to determine cover cargo, ignoring results above 92. Women are imprisoned in the trailer, behind a false wall.)

99

Dead Extraterrestrials and parts of a Flying Saucer. (Roll again to determine cover cargo, ignoring results above 92.)

100

A Vampyre’s coffin. (Roll again to determine cover cargo, ignoring results above 92.)

Gas & Diesel Pumps

d12

The gas and diesel are…

1

cheap, but high quality.

2

cheap, and average quality.

3

cheap, but low quality.

4 – 7

average price and quality.

8

average price, but high quality.

9

average price, but low quality.

10

expensive, but high quality.

11

expensive, but only average quality.

12

both expensive and low quality – a real rip-off!

Mechanic

d6

The on-site mechanic is…

1

barely competent.

2

a mechanical genius who can fix anything cheap.

3

an arrogant a**hole who thinks he’s better than everyone else.

4

an ex-con out on parole.

5

rude and crude, but knows his stuff.

6

a shady character who will look the other way at anything illegal – for a price.

Carwashing

d6

Trucks can be washed by…

1 – 2

the patrons themselves, with provided rags and soapy water.

3

the owner’s grumbling son.

4

a young man with a bad attitude.

5

an ex-con who needs the job.

6

the owner’s flirty daughter.

Restaurant

d20

The waitress is…

1

sassy,

2

kind and understanding,

3

educated and well-spoken,

4

tired and weary,

5

gruff,

6

very pretty,

7

a chain smoker,

8

always gossiping,

9

a thief,

10

sickly-looking,

11

heavy-set,

12

foreign,

13

a teenager,

14

an ex-con,

15

also a prostitute,

16

very flirty,

17 – 18

the owner’s wife,

19

the owner’s daughter,

20

actually a supernatural creature in disguise, (Angel, Devil, Vampyre, Terrestrial Sprite, Amorous Revenent, etc.)

d8

…the food is…

1 – 3

greasy and typical for the area,

4

typical but disgusting,

5 – 6

typical for the area and surprisingly tasty,

7

an unexpected foreign cuisine,

8

only one thing (hamburgers, chili, etc.),

d6

…and the coffee is…

1 – 2

mediocre.

3

strong and tasty.

4 – 5

like burning rubber, but it gets the job done.

6

weak and watery.

7

filled with grounds.

8

vile and fishy.

75% chance the Restaurant has a section where only truckers are allowed to sit.

The Lounge

d20, d6 times.

Besides [2d8] chairs, you see…

1

a radio.

2

a black and white television.

3

a color television.

4

a couch.

5

unemptied ashtrays everywhere.

6

1d8 magazines.

7

1d4 small tables.

8

a pinball machine.

9

an electric fireplace.

10

a cross on the wall.

11

cheap framed paintings.

12

1d4 cheap paperback books.

13

a newspaper.

14

a bible.

15

1d6 religious tracts.

16

knotty pine paneling.

17

taxidermy deer heads on the wall.

18

taxidermy fish on the wall.

19

Teamster Union literature

20

a pool table.

Lounge, Restaurant, and Shop Encounters

d8+d12, 1d6 times

The current patrons include:

2

Jesus or Satan himself, disguised as a trucker. (50% chance of both, playing cards or chess for souls)

3

a lost family on vacation.

4

a women on the run from her bad marriage, or abusive boyfriend.

5

a recently discharged soldier.

6

a highway police officer.

7

1d4 teenagers. (Runaways, hippies, etc.)

8

a happy trucker.

9

a mean trucker looking for trouble.

10

a lonely trucker, looking for company.

11

a biker.

12

a “lot lizard” (prostitute).

13

a trucker couple.

14

a traveling salesman.

15

a pimp. If the prostitutes working this truck stop do not have a pimp, he is looking to recruit them – or else to find runaways he can “turn out”.

16

1d6 musicians on tour.

17

a desperate father, looking for his runaway daughter.

18

a cargo pirate. Looks like any other Trucker. Will be very interested in finding out what any truckers are hauling, so they can steal it.

19

a couple on an interstate crime spree.

20

a serial killer looking for victims. 75% likely to look just like any other trucker.

Bathrooms

d20

This bathroom is…

1 – 3

clean and bright.

4 – 5

clean, but drab.

6 – 7

dreary.

8

disgustingly foul, and looks like it is seldom cleaned.

9 – 10

very dimly-lit.

11

covered in graffiti.

12 – 13

decorated in a nautical theme.

14

covered in newspapers.

15

in the middle of a renovation.

16

oddly modern and fashionable.

17 – 18

a mess, from what looks like a recent fight or struggle.

19

spattered with fresh blood.

20

literally a gateway to Hell.

65% Chance that a Truck Stop actually has separate bathrooms for men and women.

Bathroom Patrons

d20

Besides yourself there is…

1

nobody else.

1 -2

a Biker, or Biker Mama/Old Lady.

3

a Biker, or Biker Mama/Old Lady, taking drugs.

4

a drug dealer.

5

a highway patrolman.

6 – 11

a trucker, or trucker’s wife/girlfriend.

12

a trucker, or trucker’s wife/girlfriend, taking drugs.

13

an ordinary traveler.

14

a teenage runaway.

15

a child by themselves.

16

a migrant worker or musician on tour.

17

a couple having sex in a stall.

18

a “lot lizard” (men’s room) or a pimp (women’s bathroom).

19

a nondescript person apparently waiting for someone else, or someone looking for casual gay sex (late night only).

20

a supernatural creature (Vampyre, Werewolf, Restless Specter, Phantom, etc.)

Showers

d20

The showers are…

1 – 6

clean and cheap.

7

clean, but expensive.

8

clean, cheap, and regularly used for prostitution.

9

clean, expensive, regularly used for prostitution.

10

clean, cheap, and a meeting place for casual gay sex late at night.

11

clean, expensive, and a meeting place for casual gay sex late at night.

12

clean, expensive, and used for prostitution.

13 – 15

filthy and cheap.

16

filthy and expensive.

17

filthy, cheap, and used for prostitution.

18

filthy, expensive, and used for prostitution.

19

filthy, cheap, and a meeting place for casual gay sex late at night.

20

filthy, expensive, and a meeting place for casual gay sex late at night.

Bunks

d6

The bunks are…

1

just 2d6 beds in a single room.

2

small individual rooms, little bigger than the beds.

3

small individual rooms, little bigger than the beds, and very dirty.

4

almost like regular motel rooms.

5

almost like regular motel rooms, but very expensive.

6

almost like regular motel rooms, but very dirty.

Laundry

d12

The laundry facility is…

1

small, but clean.

2

small and filthy.

3

small, filthy, and the floor is wet.

4 – 5

average in size, and clean.

6

average in size, but filthy.

7

average in size and the floor is wet.

8

large, but clean.

9

large and filthy.

10

large, filthy, and the floor is wet.

11 – 12

full-service, and truckers can drop off laundry to be picked-up later.

Vending Machines

d20, 2d4 times

The vending machines dispense

1

adhesive bandages.

2

antihistamines.

3

aspirin.

4 – 5

caffeine pills

6

candies (other than chocolate).

7

chocolate bars

8

coffee.

9

cola.

10

deodorant

11

ginger-ale.

12

iced-tea.

13

knives.

14

peanuts.

15

potato chips.

16

pretzels.

17

shaving razors.

18

shoelaces.

19

soap.

20

toothpaste.

Repeated rolls indicate a wide selection of the indicated item.

Shop Items

d100, 2d6 times.

In the shop you’ll find…

1 – 3

8-track cassettes.

4

a guitar.

5 – 6

air fresheners.

7 – 8

bibles.

9 – 10

blankets & pillows.

11 – 12

boots.

13 – 14

chewing gum.

15

children’s clothing.

16

children’s toys.

17 – 23

chocolates & candy (other than gum).

24 – 29

cigarettes and tobacco products.

30 – 31

comic books.

32 – 33

condoms.

34 – 35

dashboard ornaments.

36 – 37

flowers.

38 – 39

guns & ammunition.

40 – 41

incense.

42 – 47

jerky and dried sausages.

48 – 49

knives.

50 – 51

magazines.

52 – 53

men’s clothing.

54 – 55

money orders

56 – 57

newspapers.

58 – 63

novelty mudflaps.

64 – 65

painkillers, allergy medicine, & adhesive bandages.

66 – 67

paperback books.

68 – 69

plastic sheeting.

70 – 72

portable radios.

73 – 78

potato chips, pork rinds and pretzels.

79 – 80

rope & duck tape.

81 – 82

seat covers.

83

shovels

84 – 85

soap.

86 – 90

soda / pop.

91

souvenir spoons.

92 – 93

surprisingly cheap cigarettes.

94 – 95

tire irons.

96 – 97

tire repair kits.

98

women’s clothing.

99 – 100

wrenches.

A repeated result indicates an especially large selection of the indicated item.

Drugs

d6

If you’re looking to score something stronger than coffee, you can get…

1

nothing else here – the owner doesn’t tolerate drug dealing.

2

Speed (amphetamine pills)…

3

Crank (methamphetamine)…

4

Cocaine

5

Marijuana…

6

Speed, Crank, Cocaine, and Marijuana…

d10

from…

1

a Biker stationed in the parking lot.

2

a guy in the Lounge.

3

the shopkeeper (or owner).

4

the cook in the restaurant.

5

the waitress in the restaurant.

6

the mechanic.

7

the car washer (or a guy hanging out by the washing station)

8

a “lot lizard”.

9

the local pimp.

10

the back of a truck that never seems to leave the lot.

Lot Lizards”

d10

At this truck stop, the prostitute(s) is/are…

1 – 2

not welcome – the owner calls the police as soon as they show up.

3 – 4

1d4 adult(s) working for a pimp. (Ages are 17+d12.)

5 – 6

1d4 adult(s) working independently. (Ages are 17+d20.)

7 – 8

1d4 middle-aged adult(s) working independently. (Ages are 35+d20.)

9

1d4 foreign adult(s) working for a pimp. (Ages are 17+d12.)

10

1d4 adolescent(s) working for a pimp. (Ages are 11+d6.) (Naturally, you should ignore or re-roll this result if you find the possibility too distressing, or you’d rather not play out any “Taxi Driver”-like vigilante scenarios.)
  • 95% chance a prostitute is female, and 5% chance a prostitute is male. (If the prostitute is male there is a 50% chance he is cross-dressed.)
  • 50% chance the prostitute is an alcoholic.
  • 50% chance the prostitute is a drug addict. (Determine alcoholism and drug addiction separately. Many prostitutes are both alcoholics and drug-addicts.)
  • 25% chance a prostitute will attempt to steal money or valuables.
  • 25% chance a prostitute carries a sexually transmitted disease.
  • 10% chance a prostitute is a distraction for something else. (Cargo theft, a CIA mind control experiment, etc.)
  • 5% chance an adult prostitute is actually an undercover cop.
  • 1% chance a prostitute is actually a supernatural creature in disguise. (Angel of Mercy, Seducer Devil, Terrestrial Sprite, Amorous Revenant, Restless Specter, Witch, Werewolf, Vampyre, the Incarnation of Death, etc.)

Face of a Female (or Cross-Dressed) Prostitute

D6, five times

Skin Eyes Hair Color Hair Style

Makeup

1

Very pale Blue Blonde Bouffont or Beehive Heavy and garish

2

Pale Green Light Brown Afro Heavy eye-makup only

3

Tanned Gray Red Short, pixie or bob Surprisingly well-done

4

Olive Light Brown Black Long and straight Badly-applied

5

Dark Olive Dark Brown Dirty Blonde Flip Surprising, non-standard colors

6

Black Hazel Dark Brown Pigtails None

Clothing of a Female (or Cross-Dressed) Prostitute

d6, four times

Jacket Shirt Pants / Dress Shoes

1

Denim Unbuttoned shirt or blouse, tied in the front Mini-skirt * Platform shoes

2

Leather Brassiere / babydoll / lingerie top. Hot-pants * Mary janes

3

Short fur Peasant blouse Tights Pumps

4

Suede, with fringed sleeves Dashiki Tight, bell-bottom jeans Slippers

5

Short wool T-shirt Plaid skirt * Flip-flops or sandals

6

Long wool Camisole Culottes * Go Go boots

*d4: 1 = knee socks, 2=fishnet stocking, 3=pantyhose, 4=thigh high stockings, 5 – 6 = bare legs.

Male prostitutes not cross-dressed will usually look like any other Truck Stop patron.

Lot Lizard” Hopes and Dreams

d20

If you catch them off guard, they might confess they want to…

1

go to Los Angeles and become a movie star

2

go to New York and become a Broadway star.

3

become a clothing designer.

4

open an auto shop.

5

open a bowling alley.

6

save up enough to buy a little cafe.

7

become a trucker themselves.

8

become a hairdresser.

9

escape “the life”, but it doesn’t seem possible.

10

become a madam / pimp themselves.

11

eventually get married and have a family.

12

become a preacher, and bring the good news of Jesus to other prostitutes.

13

get revenge on the relative that abused them as a child.

14

get revenge on the guy /girl who first got them hooked on dope, and made them start turning tricks.

15

get revenge on the serial killer they once escaped from.

16

get revenge on the cop who keeps extorting “freebies”.

17

write a book about their experiences.

18

contact the extraterrestrials, and escape this “sh*thole planet”.

19

find the Vampyre that supposedly hunts along this highway, and beg to be made immortal.

20

just go home, but they’re too ashamed.

Pimps

d20

The local pimp is…

1 – 3

an obviously violent and abusive monster.

4

actually the owner of the Truck Stop

5 – 6

a flamboyantly-dressed man.

7 – 9

a smooth-talking, well-dressed seducer.

10 – 11

a twitchy drug-addict.

12 – 13

an apparently even-tempered man in a suit.

14 – 15

a biker.

16 – 17

dressed like any other trucker.

18

actually the father or mother of a prostitute.

19

a nondescript man who looks like a typical suburban dad.

20

actually an extraterrestrial, or supernatural being.

Rumors and Gossip

d20

The current rumor around the Truck Stop is…

1

there’s a ghost rig that’s got no driver, but tries to run cars off the road.

2

there’s a killer working this highway, preying on girls.

3

U.F.O.s are constantly seen along this stretch of road.

4

every Wednesday night the parking lot becomes the place where every pimp in the state comes to trade prostitutes.

5

there’s a pack of werewolves that roam the area.

6

Jesus drives a rig that occasionally pulls into this lot!

7

the lot is built atop an Indian Burial Ground, and cursed.

8

the owner actually works for the C.I.A.

9

the owner takes a cut of every illegal deal that occurs here.

10

the owners wife /husband is buried under the parking lot.

11

the place is used as meeting ground by foreign spies.

12

the “Lot Lizards” all work for the KGB.

13

the road nearby is haunted by a Phantom Hitchhiker.

14

after 2 AM, a man with no face sometimes wander the edge of the parking lot.

15

the Apocalypse will begin soon, with a battle of Angels and Demons in the parking lot.

16

the ghost of a legendary driver still pulls their phantom rig into the parking lot.

17

unmarked military vehicles drive by occasionally. They don’t look like the U.S. Army, or even the National Guard.

18

One of the Lot Lizards is murdering truckers.

19

The Government puts tiny tracking devices into the gas, so they can track you everywhere you go.

20

The highway exits for Heaven and Hell are both nearby.

Truck Stop Events

d20

Unexpectedly…

1

a truck careens into the parking lot, hitting several parked rigs.

2

a bloodied woman escapes from the sleeping compartment of a parked truck.

3

1d4 police cars arrive to arrest the Lot Lizards (and their pimp if present).

4

you see a “lot lizard” douching with cola in the parking lot.

5

a Rock n’ Roll or Country & Western band’s tour bus pulls in.

6

a U.F.O appears overhead.

7

rival truckers (or bikers) begin shooting at each other.

8

there’s a stabbing in the Lounge (or Laundry Room).

9

blood is bubbling up from the drains in the showers.

10

a rig explodes in the parking lot.

11

a black luxury car with blacked-out windows and government license plates pulls into the lot. Out of it come 2d4 men in black suits and sunglasses, who proceed to break open the back of every trailer, and interrogate every trucker about their cargo.

12

a body falls from the sky.

13

an armed gang of obvious former prostitutes starts shooting at the pimp who runs the “lot lizards” here, or a violent pimp appears and begins roughing up a “lot lizard” until she agrees to work for him.

14

Mindless Revenants begin encircling the Truck Stop.

15

a rabid dog wanders into the parking lot, and begins attacking.

16

a van (or bus) full of “Jesus Freaks” pulls into the lot.

17

a van (or bus) full of nuns singing hymns pulls into the lot.

18

a van (or bus) full of Hare Krishnas pulls into the lot.

19

a film crew shooting a documentary wants to interview truckers and travelers.

20

a car full of rich college kids pulls in, looking to buy drugs and/or pickup prostitutes.

A New B/X Thief

Tags

, , , , , , , , ,


Amélie Diéterle au théâtre (1900) dans « Les Brigands » (C)

The classic Thief of the B/X (and BECMI) rules has always been a character class with problems – starting with the fact that B/X Thieves aren’t actually very good at stealing things or being stealthy until they reach high levels.  So, here is my personal “fix” for the Class. Like the other B/X Character Classes I’ve posted here recently, this one is built on a “five Special Abilities + two Restrictions/Weaknesses” framework, assumes the use of a “five-point” Alignment system, and has flavor text that integrates it into my “Panzoasia” setting.

Human Thief

Abilities: Str: 3d6 | Int: 1d12+6 | Wis: 3d6 | Dex: 1d8+10 | Con: 3d6 | Cha: 1d12+6
Special Abilities: Appraise, Backstab, Cant, Climb, Thieving Ability.
Restrictions and Weaknesses: Criminal Entanglements, Weapon Restrictions.
Hit Dice: d4 per Level, until 9th. Add 2 Hit Points per Level thereafter.
Alignment: Any except Lawful.
Starting Age: 12+d12
Starting Language(s): Western Common, Thieves’ Cant.


Typical Starting Equipment:

  • Leather armor.
  • Black cloak.
  • Black “domino” mask.
  • 2 daggers.
  • 1 razor (for cutting purses).
  • 1 Short Bow.
  • 20 arrows.
  • Leather quiver.
  • Backpack.
  • 1 set of ordinary clothes.
  • Soft-soled boots.
  • 50 feet of hemp rope.
  • Grappling hook.
  • Crowbar.
  • 1 set of Thieves Picks and Tools.
  • Sponge.
  • 1 week of rations (dried sausage, hard cheese, hardtack bread, and dried apples).
  • 1 piece of stolen jewelry (worth 1d10 gp).
  • 2d4 gp.

Your character lives outside the law, stealing as a way of life. Perhaps they were born to a wealthy family, but craved a life of excitement without limits. Maybe they were orphaned as a child, and made to steal coins for their foster parents. They might have first resorted to thievery to care for a sick parent, sibling, or child. Or perhaps they were simply tired of playing by the rules that kept them and their family poor. However they came to thievery, your character has learned to sneak, to creep, and to bypass security. They can tell choice jewelry from worthless junk. And whatever your fellow adventurers think of their morality, your Thief will quickly learn that the others need them to scout for danger, disarm traps, and open locked portals.

The Thieves the Ultimate West are bound together in a common organization. This “Thieves Guild” originated during the Reign of the Monsters as a gang of Humans and Halflings led by the Immortal Heroine known as “The Clever Lady”. Originally, the Thieves Guild was simply dedicated to stealing back the treasures looted by the Monsters and Depradators, and restoring them to the Five Peoples. Now the Thieves Guild is an international secret society that both profits from, and regulates, criminal activity of all kinds. Among the common folk, the Thieves Guild still has a reputation for dispensing justice when the regular authorities can’t – or won’t. Indeed, many Good-Aligned Thieves endeavor to emulate the example of The Clever Lady – stealing only from the Evil and over-privileged, and distributing charity to the poor. Most other Thieves, however, are only in it for themselves.

The main enemies of the Thieves Guild in the Ultimate West are the Clerics of Destiny (Law). Whereas most other people at least accept the existence of the Guild, the Lawful clergy are relentless in their condemnation and persecution of it. This puts the Clerics of Destiny in conflict not only with the Clerics of Chance (Chaos) who are allied with the Thieves Guild, but also the Clerics of Light (Good) – who fear that the Guild (undoubtedly corrupt and problematic in its current form) might be replaced by a far more malevolent group.

 

Special Abilities of Human Thieves

Appraise: You can roll an Intelligence Check for your Thief to accurately estimate the total number of coins in a pile (or container) without actually taking time to count them individually; or to know the real value of gems, jewelry, art objects, and commodities.

  • Your character cannot identify Magic Items, and will not necessarily know the correct use of exotic and unusual objects.
  • The information will be communicated to you privately. You can choose to honestly share it with your character’s fellow adventurers, or lie.
  • Because a Thief’s ability to Appraise involves quickly doing arithmetic with their fingers, hands, arms, and feet, they cannot Appraise while bearing two-handed melee weapons.

Backstab: When your characters attacks someone who is unaware of their presence, you make the Attack Roll with a +4 Bonus, and double the damage done on a successful attack.

  • Your Thief cannot Backstab while wearing any armor heavier than Leather, or bearing a two-handed melee weapon.

Cant: In addition to speaking the Common tongue, your character can communicate in a unique mixture of slang, metaphors, foreign words, postures, gestures, and innuendos called Thieves’ Cant.

  • While one cannot have a philosophical discussion using Thieves’ Cant, it is more than sufficient to plan a burglary, warn a fellow Thief about nearby guards, or purchase stolen goods.
  • Ordinary people cannot actually understand Thieves’ Cant – but using it in polite society instantly marks one as a member of the criminal underworld.
  • Because it requires making certain gestures and striking certain poses, a Thief cannot communicate in Cant while bearing a two-handed melee weapon.

Climb: You can make a Dexterity Check for your Thief to Climb difficult and sheer surfaces impossible for other people to scale.

  • You must make another Check for every 100 feet scaled.
  • Your Thief cannot Climb while wearing any armor heavier than Leather, or while bearing a two-handed melee weapon.

Thieving Ability: Your character has a seventh Ability score, called “Thieving Ability”. Roll your character’s Thieving Ability or less on a d20 to do such things as:

  • Hear noises occurring on the other side or a door or wall, and discern any whispered words heard. Non-Thieves have a 1 in 6 chance to hear a noise across a wall or door, but are unable to actually understand conversations.
  • Completely hide in shadows, even when being observed. Your Thief must be wearing dull, or dark colored clothing.
  • Move silently across surfaces (such as old wood or hard stone) where other people will always make some noise.
  • Pick pockets (or purses) of people otherwise unaware of your character’s presence. Only Thieves and Illusionists can pick pockets.
  • Find non-obvious traps, both in the environment and on containers. Characters who are not Thieves can find traps only by specifically describing what they are looking for.
  • Remove traps that have been detected, without triggering them. Characters who are not Thieves, Gnomish Tinkerers, or Halfling Rovers cannot remove traps without triggering them in some way.
  • Pick locks (provided that your character has a lock pick, or a plausible improvisation of one). Characters who are not Thieves cannot pick locks at all – they can only destroy them.

Your character’s base Thieving Ability begins at 7, and increases by 1 each Level (as shown on Human Thief Advancement Table). Your character’s Dexterity Modifier is added to their Thieving Ability.

At the GM’s discretion, Thieving Ability might be useful in other circumstances requiring stealth, agility, and/or manual skill beyond what an ordinary person would possess.

Your character cannot use their Thieving Ability while wearing any armor heavier than Leather, or bearing a two-handed melee weapon.

 

Restrictions and Weaknesses of Human Thieves

Criminal Entanglements: If your Thief lives in a town, they must become a member of the local Thieves’ Guild. Besides the benefits it provides, membership in the Guild also creates a number of complications for your character:

  • Your character must give the Guild 10% of the value of everything they steal, including treasure recovered from dungeons.
  • They will be tattooed with the mark of the Guild. Thieves who move around a lot will have many tattoos from various local Guilds.
  • Every month there is a 20% chance that your character will be ordered to steal a specific item and deliver it to the Master / Mistress of the Guild (or their representative). Failure to at least attempt the job will result in expulsion from the Guild.
  • Major thievery in town (worth over 50gp) must be cleared with the Guild before being attempted. Failure to do so will result in expulsion.
  • Your character is expected to defer to their superiors in the Guild, to physically protect them, and to avenge them if they are harmed.
  • Your character is expected to esteem their fellow Guild members above all other people – including their family, friends, and even their spouse.
  • All Guild Thieves are expected to minimize physical harm done to people in the course of thievery they conduct in town. Assaulting children or non-combatant women will result in immediate expulsion – even if the Thief is a child or woman themselves.
  • Since the Guild considers itself to have a monopoly on criminal behavior in its area, your character is expected to punish anyone they see committing any unsanctioned crime. The Guild does not tolerate ordinary civilians stealing, committing assaults, vandalizing, abusing the innocent, or violating holy places. For that reason, local authorities (other than Lawful Clerics) tend to turn a blind eye to the Guild’s continued existence.

If your character steals from townsfolk without being a member of the Thieves Guild, they will be approached by another Thief who will demand they join, and retroactively pay the 10% Guild fee. If your character do not join the Guild (or steals after being expelled), they will be put under sentence of death.

Weapon and Armor Restrictions:

  • A Thief cannot use any of their Special Abilities while they bear any two-handed melee weapons (Bows and crossbows do not count) Nor can they effectively utilize such weapons.
  • Wearing any armor heavier than Leather prevents a Thief from from using the following Special Abilities: Backstab, Climb, and Thieving Ability.

Destiny at 9th Level

Your character may either open a new branch of the Thieves Guild (in an area where it never existed, or had been destroyed), or attempt to usurp control of your local Thieves Guild.

  • If your Thief builds (or remodels) a hideout, and opens a branch of an existing Thieves’ Guild, they will be sent 2d4 1st Level Thieves – one of which is almost certainly a spy reporting back to the main Guild.
  • To wrest control of the local Guild, your character must either eliminate the existing Guildmaster, persuade them somehow to retire, or persuade the majority of Guild members to support them. Your character will almost certainly make lasting enemies of the previous Guildmaster (if they continue to live), and the supporters of the old regime.

Destiny at 14th Level

Your character may attempt to impose their authority over all the local Thieves’ Guilds in the Ultimate West.

  • There may be multiple 14th Level Thieves that have the honorary title of “King” or “Queen”, but only one of them can be in formal control of all the Thieves’ Guilds.
  • Your character will need to persuade the Guildmasters of at least half the major cities of the Ultimate West to support them – or else eliminate those Guildmasters and replace them with supporters.
  • If your character succeeds, the remaining Thieves’ Guilds will fall in line, and accept your Thief as unquestioned King (or Queen) of All Thieves.
  • If there is another 14th Level Thief whom your character has replaced as formal head of the Thieves’ Guild, the former King or Queen will become an implacable enemy for the remainder of their life – and possibly beyond!

 

Human Thief Advancement Table

Exp. Points (Hours played)

Exp. Level

Level Title

Hit Points

THAC0 [Attack Roll Bonus]

Thieving Ability (roll equal or under on d20.)

0

1

Finagler

1d4

19 0

7 + Dex. modifier

1,500 (8 hours)

2

Robber

2d4

18 [+1]

8 + Dex. modifier

4,000 (24 hours)

3

Filcher

3d4

18 [+1]

9 + Dex. modifier

7,000 (36 hours)

4

Prowler

4d4

18 [+1]

10 + Dex. modifier

13,000 (48 hours)

5

Burglar

5d4

17 [+2]

11 + Dex. modifier

25,000 (60 hours)

6

Housebreaker

6d4

17 [+2]

12 + Dex. modifier

50,000 (72 hours)

7

Master Thief

7d4

17 [+2]

13 + Dex. modifier

100,000 (84 hours)

8

Ringleader

8d4

16 [+3]

14 + Dex. modifier

180,000 (96 hours)

9

Upright Man / Upright Woman

9d4

16 [+3]

15 + Dex. modifier

300,000 (108 hours)

10

Upright Man / Upright Woman

9d4+2

16 [+3]

16 + Dex. modifier

420,000 (120 hours)

11

Upright Man / Upright Woman

9d4+4

15 [+4]

17 + Dex. modifier

540,000 (132 hours)

12

Upright Man / Upright Woman

9d4+6

15 [+4]

18 + Dex. modifier

660,000 (144 hours)

13

Upright Man / Upright Woman

9d4+8

15 [+4]

19 + Dex. modifier

780,000 (156 hours)

14

King of Thieves / Queen of Thieves

9d4+10

14 [+5]

20 + Dex. modifier

Human Thief Saving Throws

Level

Poison / Death Ray / Disease

Wands / Psionics

Paralysis / Petrification

Dragon Breath / Explosives / Firearms

Spell /Staff / Rod

1

13

14

15

12

16

2 – 3

12

13

14

11

15

4 – 5

11

12

13

10

14

6 – 7

10

11

12

9

13

8 – 9

9

10

11

8

12

10 –11

8

9

10

7

11

12 – 13

7

8

9

6

10

14

6

7

8

5

9

Permutations and Variations of the Human Thief

HALFLING BURGLAR

The Halflings of the Thieves Guild are particularly valued for their ability to function in low-light conditions, and elude guards. They are notorious for often not discriminating between junk and treasure, however!

  • Special Abilities: Backstab, Nightvision (as per Halfling Rover), Small Target (as per Halfling Rover), Thieving Ability, Thieves’ Cant
  • Restrictions and Weaknesses: Criminal Entanglements, Small Stature (as per Halfling Rover)
  • Destiny at 9th Level: As Human Thief (Many local Thieves Guilds are actually headed by Halflings.)
  • Destiny at 14th Level: As Human Thief (The Clever Lady herself was a Halfling.)

Modern Vehicles for GROOVY Ghastly Affair

Tags

, , , , , , , , , ,


1973 El Camino

As with the play-test rules for modern firearms, these guidelines will probably be subject to some refinement and simplification before final publication in GROOVY Ghastly Affair. Try them out while driving on the Uncanny Highway.

When the Vehicle Rules Matter

Drivers are assumed to be able to operate their vehicles in most common situations without the need for any kind of dice roll. If a Player simply wants their character to drive to the corner store to grab some milk, the Presenter should simply state that they do so safely and without incident.

However, if the Player Characters will face Danger while operating their vehicles (such as a Fight, a Chase, an Escape, or any situation that could result in harm), then the Attributes of the vehicle(s) involved come into play. Drivers will have to make Dexterity Checks to complete any challenging maneuvers without losing control and Crashing.

The Attributes of Vehicles

Vehicles are defined by four Attributes: Vehicle Speed, Armor Class, Hit Points, and Handling Modifier.

Vehicle Speed is a factor chiefly during vehicle Chases, and is measured on a different scale from the Speed scores of people and animals.

  • Each point of Vehicle Speed equals 10 miles (or approximately 16 kilometers) per hour rate of travel.
  • A very healthy person (ordinary Speed 9) running as fast as they can attains Vehicle Speed 1.
  • A car with Vehicle Speed of 10 can travel a maximum of 100 miles per hour, while one with Vehicle Speed 20 can attain 200 miles an hour.
  • Obviously, a vehicle does not always travel at its maximum Speed, especially since most roads have a legal speed limit of some kind.

Armor Class is the Penalty to the Attack Check for anything trying to damage the vehicle, or its passengers. Thus, it functions just like Armor Class does for any character or creature.

Hit Points define how much damage the vehicle can sustain before it becomes non-functional.

  • At 0 Hit Points, the vehicle is inoperable. A moving vehicle reduced to 0 Hit Points (or less) will Crash into a nearby object the next Round.
  • At -10, Hit Points, a vehicle is so broken that it can no longer be repaired.

Handling Modifier is a Bonus or Penalty to the driver’s Dexterity Check when they attempt difficult or challenging maneuvers with their vehicle (besides speeding up, slowing down, coming to a gradual stop, making an expected turn at low speed, or parking). Situations where a Driver should make a Dexterity Check with the Handling Modifier include:

  • Driving around an obstacle at high speed.
  • Attempting to maintain a Chase while in traffic (Check each Round).
  • Attempting to turn while maintaining full speed in a Chase.
  • Stopping suddenly.
  • Making a sudden or unexpected turn.
  • Preventing or forcing the movement of another vehicle.
  • Running another vehicle off the road (requires a Dexterity Contest).
  • Maintaining control of a vehicle while firing a gun.
  • Driving while intoxicated or distracted. (Check every third of a mile, or half a kilometer.)
  • Any situation were failure could result in serious bodily injury.

Failing any of the above Checks results in a Crash (see below).


A typical 4-door Sedan has the following Attributes:
Vehicle Speed: 10
Armor Class: 2
Hit Points: 20
Handling Modifier: 0 (None)


Fights Involving Vehicles

Anyone directing an Attack towards a Vehicle and/or it passengers must make two Attack Checks.

The first Attack Check is against the vehicle’s Armor Class.

  • Damage from this Attack is subtracted from the vehicle’s Hit Points.

The second Attack Check is against one of the passengers.

  • If the attacker does not specify which passenger (or cannot see the passengers well enough to distinguish a desired target) the target is chosen at random.
  • The vehicle’s Armor Class is added to the target’s own.
  • If the driver is killed, the vehicle Crashes into a nearby object the next Round.
  • Note that it possible to kill a passenger without doing any major damage to the vehicle itself – by putting a bullet through the door or window, for example.

Firing at or from Moving Vehicles

  • Anyone attacking from a moving vehicle suffers a -2 Penalty on the Check.
  • Attacks against a moving vehicle, and/or its passengers, incur a -2 Penalty.
  • Attacks against a moving vehicle, from a moving vehicle, incur a total Penalty of -4.

Ramming With a Vehicle

Deliberately crashing into another vehicle to damage it (and its passengers) while minimizing harm to yourself and your vehicle requires making a Dexterity Check with the vehicle’s Handling Modifier.

  • If the check succeeds, the ramming vehicle suffers 1d6 points of Damage, but its Driver and Passengers only suffer 1d6 points of Nonlethal Damage. The struck vehicle however, suffers Damage equal to the current Hit Points of the Ramming Vehicle, and every occupant (or rider) therein suffers 1d6 points of Lethal Damage and 1d6 Points of Nonlethal Damage.
  • If the driver attempting to ram fails their Dexterity Check, everyone involved suffers 1d6 points of Lethal Damage and 1d6 points of Nonlethal Damage. Both vehicles also suffer Hit Point Damage equal to the current Hit Points of the vehicle whose driver attempted the ram. (The ramming vehicle is thus rendered inoperable.)

Deliberately Hitting Pedestrians

A driver deliberately trying to hit pedestrians must make a Dexterity Check with the Handling Modifier.

  • If the Check succeeds, the driver strikes one pedestrian that for each point of their current Vehicle Speed. The Lethal Damage inflicted on each struck pedestrian is 1d6 + the driver’s Damage Bonus.
  • If the Driver fails their Dexterity Check, they lose control and Crash the vehicle (see below).

 

Chases Involving Vehicles

Vehicle Chases on the open road are conducted much like any other Chase in Ghastly Affair.

  1. Determine the Lead (distance between quarry and pursuer).
  2. Each Round, the side with the lower Vehicle Speed score tries to roll under it on a d20. The Contest Penalty for the roll is equal to half the Vehicle Speed of the faster side.
  3. If the two sides have the same Vehicle Speed, flip a coin to determine who wins.
  4. If the pursuer wins, the Lead is reduced by feet equal to ten times their Vehicle Speed score.
  5. If the quarry wins, the Lead is increased by feet equal to ten times their Vehicle Speed score.
  6. Once the two vehicles are in contact, the driver(s) can attempt such things as running the other vehicle off the road (and causing a Crash), forcing the other vehicle to make a turn, or even ramming the other vehicle.

A driver who wishes to use an Incantation or Preternatural Power while engaged in a vehicle Chase must stop to do so. Passengers may do so freely, however.

Chases in Traffic

In addition to the above procedure, both pursuer and quarry must make a Dexterity check each Round (with their vehicle’s Handling Modifier) or Crash into a nearby car (see below).

Running Another Car Off the Road

If two cars close the lead to 0 and come into Contact during a Chase, one of the drivers can attempt to run the other off the road.

  • The two Drivers engage in a Dexterity Contest.
  • If the aggressor wins, the victim will be run off the road. The victim must then Save versus Dexterity, or lose control of their vehicle and Crash into a nearby obstacle the next Round.
  • If the victim wins the Dexterity Contest, then the aggressor will lose control and Crash into a nearby obstacle the next Round.

 

Escapes Involving Vehicles

Throwing a Tail

Losing (or maintaining) a Tail when Vehicles are involved can be handled in a similar manner to when both tracker and target are on foot

  • If the environment provides areas where the target can get lost (traffic, a busy city, etc.), then the target and follower must engage in an Intelligence Contest.
  • If the target wins, the follower loses track of them.
  • If the follower wins, then the target is usable to lose their follower.

 

Crashing Vehicles

Everyone on or within a vehicle involved in a Crash must Save versus Dexterity, or take both 1d6 points of Lethal Damage and 1d6 points of Nonlethal Damage. A Crashed Vehicle suffers damage equal to 1d6, multiplied by the Vehicle Speed at which it was traveling when the Crash occurred.

  • For example, a Coupe (with 20 Hit Points) crashes on the highway while traveling at Vehicle Speed 6 (60 mph). The Presenter rolls a 4 on a d6, indicating that the driver suffers 4 points of Damage. The driver (who had 3 Hit Points) is now at -1 Hit Points – unconscious, and likely to die in 9 Rounds (90 seconds) unless they get immediate medical attention. In the passenger seat is the driver’s friend. The Presenter rolls a 2, and a 4, on a d6, indicating that the passenger (who had 4 Hit Points) suffers 2 points of Lethal Damage and 4 points of Nonlethal Damage. Since Nonlethal Damage is restored at the rate of 1 point per Turn (10 minutes), the passenger will be knocked out for 20 minutes after the Crash. The Presenter then rolls a d6 for the car’s damage, with the result of a 2. This is multiplied by 6, since the car was traveling at Speed 6. The car suffers 12 points of damage – it is significantly damaged, but is still operable.

 

Vehicles as Hazards

Burning Cars

  • Contacting a Burning Car inflicts 1d6 points of Lethal Damage, and ignites an inflammable materials worn or carried.
  • Being trapped inside a Burning Car inflicts 1d6 points of Lethal Damage, plus 1d6 points of Nonlethal Damage, per Round. Additionally, the victim must Save versus Constitution each Round, of suffer 1 point each of permanent Charisma, Dexterity, and Constitution damage.

Car Explosions

An exploding car inflicts 5d6 points of Lethal Damage to everyone in the Nearby Area, and ignites all inflammable materials therein. Victims not actually in the car can make a Dexterity Save for half damage.

 

Land Vehicles of the Swinging Sixties and Groovy Seventies

Vehicle Type

Occupancy (With Driver)

Vehicle

Speed

AC

Hit

Points

Handling Modifier

Special Characteristics

Ambulance

4 (+2 beds)

8

2

40

-2

 

Bicycle

1

2

0

10

+2

 

Bulldozer

1

3

4

100

-2

Front Shovel can be used as an attack for 1d6 + Damage Bonus. A Bulldozer can freely Ram without it (or its driver) incurring any damage)

Bus

41 – 61

8

2

50

-2

A typical yellow school bus or city bus.

Convertible or Roadster (Ford Thunderbird, Oldsmobile 98, MGB, etc.)

2 or 4

11

1

18

None

Dead body can fit in trunk.

Coupe (2-door)

4

10

2

20

None

Dead body can fit in trunk.

Coupe Utility (El Camino, Ranchero, etc.)

2 (4 can ride in cargo bed)

10

2

25

0

Two dead bodies can be placed in one layer on cargo bed.

Dune Buggy

2

8

1

15

+2

 

Economy Car (Renault 4, Volkswagen Beetle, Mini, etc.)

2 (+2 small or slender people)

7

1

15

0

Generally more popular in Europe than the United States before 1973 – except for the Beetle, which is ubiquitous. Dead body can fit in trunk, if disarticulated.

Fire Engine

6

8

3

100

-2

 

Half-Track

13

5

9

100

-2

Usually mounted with a heavy Machine Gun.

Jeep, Military

2 or 4

6

2

50

None

May be mounted with heavy Machine Gun when on the battlefield.

Limousine, or Luxury Car (Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow, Cadillac Eldorado, Lincoln Continental, Bentley T-Series, etc.)

4

10

2

40

0

Two dead bodies can fit in trunk.

Limousine, Stretch

8

8

2

60

-2

Two dead bodies can fit in trunk.

Limousine, Armored

4

8

6

80

0

Two dead bodies can fit in trunk.

Locomotive Engine (Diesel)

2

10

6

100

-2 *

Can only follow its track.

Moped

1

3

0

10

+2

 

Motorcycle

2

11

None

15

+2

 

Motorcycle, Chopper (“Digger” style)

2

11

None

15

-2

May grant the Asset “Cool Bike” when dealing with Bikers.

Motorcycle, with Sidecar

3

9

1

20

0

Dead body can be transported in sidecar.

Motorhome (Winnebago, etc.)

6

8

3

40

-2

Can store sufficient food and water for a week before resupply.

Muscle Car (Plymouth “Hemi ‘Cuda”, AMC Rebel, Pontiac GTO, etc.)

4

15

2

30

None

Mainly American-made. Dead body can fit in trunk.

Pickup Truck

2 (6 can ride in cargo bed)

10

2

30

None

Six dead bodies can be placed in one layer on cargo bed.

Police Patrol Car

2 (plus 2 prisoners in back)

10

2

30

+2

Generally based on a modified 4-door sedan. Partition prevents prisoners in back seat from attacking front seats.

Racecar, Formula

1

20

1

15

+2

Cannot go off-road.

Scooter (Vespa, Lambretta)

2

3

None

15

None

Common in Europe, unpopular the the United States.

Sedan (4-door)

5

10

2

20

None

The basic American car. Dead body can fit in trunk.

Sportscar (Jaguar E-Type, Porche 911, Alfa Romeo Spider, Corvette Sing Ray, etc.)

2 or 4

13

2

20

+2

European-made are generally considered superior. May grant the Asset “Sexy Car” to Driver.

Station Wagon

6

10

2

25

-2

Dead body can fit in trunk when back seats are folded down.

Tank (M48, M60, T55, etc.)

4

3

10*

100

-2

*Invulnerable to anything less than a Rocket-Propelled Grenade or Heavy Artillery Gun. The Tank’s own Heavy Artillery Gun inflicts 10d6 + gunner’s Damage Bonus.

Tractor, Farming

1

2

1

30

-2

 

Truck, Delivery

2

8

2

40

-2

Eight dead bodies will fit in one layer in back.

Truck, Semi Tractor (without Trailer)

2 (4 with sleeping compartment)

10

4

60

-2

Four dead bodies will fit in sleeping compartment.

Truck, 18-Wheeler (Tractor & Trailer)

2 (4 with sleeping compartment)

10

4

100

-4

Modern standardized shipping containers are are becoming common during the Groovy Age, but are not yet universal.

Van (and Camper Van)

2 – 6

10

4

30

-2

Often fancily decorated and/or outfitted with chairs, tables, and beds inside. Eight dead bodies will fit inside.

Van, Police (Paddy Wagon)

2, + 6 in back.

10

4

30

-2

Partition prevents prisoners in back from attacking front seats. Might also be used to transport members of the new SWAT units that are being created during the Groovy Age. Eight dead bodies will fit in one layer in back.

Vehicle Speed x 10 = Miles per hour

Vehicle Speed x 16 = approximate Kilometers per Hour

Modern Firearms for Ghastly Affair and GROOVY Ghastly Affair

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , ,


Here are some “official” play-test rules for adding modern firearms to Ghastly Affair. They facilitate not only GROOVY Ghastly Affair Sagas set in the Swinging Sixties (and beyond), but Affairs involving characters traveling back and forth through time between the 18th and 20th centuries (perhaps by way of an old New England mansion riddled with dimensional portals).

About Modern Guns

A big difference between the assumed time periods of regular Ghastly Affair and GROOVY Ghastly Affair is the power and effectiveness of available firearms. While most guns of the Ghastly Age (1765 – 1820) are inaccurate smooth bore weapons, with relatively limited ranges and low rates of fire, the guns available to characters in the Swinging Sixties and Groovy Seventies are potentially much deadlier.

The Simple Approach

If you want a simpler, faster-moving game, simply treat an attack from modern firearms like any other, inflicting Lethal Damage of 1d6, plus the shooter’s Damage Bonus. In the simple approach, all long guns have a range of 1,000 feet, while all handguns and shotguns have a range of 300 feet. This is probably the approach you’ll want to use if your Saga involves a team of Parapsychologists investigating psychic phenomena, or is the type of Gothic Romance where young women in diaphanous gowns look over their shoulders as they flee old mansions in the night.

What follows is a more detailed and “realistic” treatment of guns that takes into account the capacities and particular characteristics of late 20th century firearms. If your Sage involves a team of Demon Hunters bravely fighting an international Satanic conspiracy that has infested the highest levels of government, try the following rules.

The Detailed Approach

If the shooter only fires a single shot in a Round, a shot from a gun is treated just like any other ordinary attack in Ghastly Affair, usually inflicting 1d6 points of Lethal damage, plus the shooter’s Damage Bonus. (High caliber guns, however, inflict 2d6 +Damage Bonus).

If the type of the gun used allows for multiple shots in a ten-second Round, then the shooter must first announce how many shot they will be firing at the target, before the Attack Check is made. If the Check fails, all the shots are wasted. If the attack succeeds, it inflicts the usual damage for an attack, plus one additional point per shot fired. (Multiple shots from High caliber firearms, on the other hand, inflict two additional points per shot fired).

  • For example: An insane Cultist (Level 2 Everyman) fires five shots at a Parapsychologist from a Revolver. The cultist makes their Attack Check, and rolls a 3 for Damage. The Parapsychologist takes 9 points of Lethal Damage: 3 from the die roll, 1 additional because of the Cultist’s Damage Bonus, and 5 more because five shots were fired.

A Telescopic Sight (or “Scope”) grants the shooter a +2 Bonus on the Attack Check, if they only fire one shot that Round. This Bonus stacks with all others, For example a single shot from a Bolt Action Rifle with a Scope is made at a +4 Bonus.

Special characteristics for each type of firearms are detailed hereafter. Only weapons available during the mid 1960s to mid 1970s are included.

Assault Rifle (AK-47, FN FAL, M14, M16, G3, etc.)

Assault Rifles are lighter and more portable than Machine Guns. They differ from Submachine Guns in using medium-sized rifle cartridges, rather than handgun ammunition. An Assault Rifle can fire up to 150 shots per Round in full automatic mode. Most however, only have 30 round (detachable) magazines. The weapon can be reloaded in the same Round it is fired if a pre-loaded magazine is available. Otherwise it takes 3 Rounds to fully reload the magazine. An Assault Rifle has an effective range of 1,000 feet.

  • Multiple Shots: The shooter can fire up to 150 shots at a single target in a Round. The amount must be announced before the Attack Check is made. If the Attack is successful, the target takes additional damage equal to the number of shots fired. If the Attack fails, all the shots are wasted.
  • Spray: If fired in full automatic mode, an Assault Rifle can also be used to turn the entire Nearby area into a Hazard. The shooter does not make a normal Attack Check. However, any person in the affected area (or who tries to enter it that Round) must make a Dexterity Save, or take 1d6 damage. A Spray empties the entire magazine of the gun.

Derringer

These small single-shot handguns are designed to be concealed. Most derringers can only be loaded with a single shot, and have an effective range of 30 feet.

  • Concealable: A causal viewer will not know the carrier is armed. Someone who is actively looking for a concealed gun can make a Wisdom Check to notice the Derringer.
  • Quick Draw: The shooter’s side always wins initiative in the first Round of a Fight against opponents using firearms that do not have the Quick Draw characteristic.

Pistol, Revolver (.38 Special, .357 Magnum, .44 Magnum, etc.)

Most full-size revolvers hold 6 shots in their cylinder, and take a full Round to completely reload. They have an effective range of 300 feet.

  • Accurate: If a shooter fires only once in a Round, their Attack Check is made at a +2 Bonus.
  • Multiple Shots: The shooter can fire up to 6 shots at a single target in a Round. The amount must be announced before the Attack Check is made. If the Attack is successful, the target takes additional damage equal to the number of shots fired. If the Attack fails, all the shots are wasted.

Pistol, Snubnose (Colt Detective Special, Smith & Wesson Model 36, etc.)

Designed for use by detectives, these weapons are often carried in ankle holsters, pockets, in even inside purses. Most Snubnose Revolvers hold 6 shots in their cylinder, and take a full Round to completely reload. They have an effective range of 100 feet.

  • Concealable: A causal viewer will not know the carrier is armed. Someone who is actively looking for a concealed gun can make a Wisdom Check to notice the Pistol.
  • Multiple Shots: The shooter can fire up to 6 shots at a single target in a Round. The amount must be announced before the Attack Check is made. If the Attack is successful, the target takes additional damage equal to the number of shots fired. If the Attack fails, all the shots are wasted.
  • Quick Draw: The shooter’s side always wins initiative in the first Round of a Fight against opponents using firearms that do not have the Quick Draw characteristic.

Pistol, Saturday Night Special

These cheap guns hold 6 shots in their cylinder like any other Revolver, and take a full Round to completely reload. They only have an effective range of 60 feet, however.

  • Multiple Shots: The shooter can fire up to 6 shots at a single target in a Round. The amount must be announced before the Attack Check is made. If the Attack is successful, the target takes additional damage equal to the number of shots fired. If the Attack fails, all the shots are wasted.
  • Prone to Malfunction: There is a 1 in 20 chance per shot fired that the gun will either jam (wasting the entire Attack), or explode (inflicting 1d6 Lethal Damage on the shooter).

Pistol, Semi-Automatic (.45 Caliber M1911, 9mm Browning Hi-Power, Walter P38, etc. )

Most automatic Pistols have magazines that hold 7 to 15 shots. They can reloaded in the same Round they are fired, if a pre-filled magazine is available to be inserted. Otherwise, it takes a Round to fully reload the magazine with bullets. They have an effective range of 300 feet.

  • Multiple Shots: The shooter can fire up to 9 shots at a single target in a Round. The amount must be announced before the Attack Check is made. If the Attack is successful, the target takes additional damage equal to the number of shots fired. If the Attack fails, all the shots are wasted.

Pistol, Semi-Automatic Pocket (Walter PPK, Baretta M418, Marakov Pistol, etc.)

These small semi-automatic Pistols are often carried by undercover operatives. Like Snubnose Revolvers, they can be easily carried inside a waistband, or concealed in pockets and purses. A Semi-Automatic Pocket Pistol has a magazine of 6 to 9 Shots, and takes 1 Round to Reload (unless a pre-loaded magazine is swapped in). It has an effective range of 100 feet.

  • Concealable: A causal viewer will not know the carrier is armed. Someone who is actively looking for a concealed gun can make a Wisdom Check to notice the Pistol.
  • Multiple Shots: The shooter can fire up to 9 shots at a single target in a Round. The amount must be announced before the Attack Check is made. If the Attack is successful, the target takes additional damage equal to the number of shots fired. If the Attack fails, all the shots are wasted.
  • Quick Draw: The shooter’s side always wins initiative in the first Round of a Fight against opponents using firearms that do not have the Quick Draw characteristic.

Pistol, Machine (Stechkin APS, Skorpion, MAC-10, etc.)

Machine Pistols are automatic weapons that use handgun ammunition and are designed to be used with one hand. A Machine Pistol can fire up to 150 shots per Round in full automatic mode. Most however, only have 30 round magazines. The weapon can be reloaded in the same Round it is fired if a pre-loaded magazine is available. Otherwise it takes 3 Rounds to fully reload the magazine. Like other handguns, Machine Pistols have an effective range of 300 feet.

  • Multiple Shots: The shooter can fire up to 150 shots at a single target in a Round. The amount must be announced before the Attack Check is made. If the Attack is successful, the target takes additional damage equal to the number of shots fired. If the Attack fails, all the shots are wasted.
  • Spray: If fired in full automatic mode, a Machine Pistol can also be used to turn the entire Nearby area into a Hazard. The shooter does not make a normal Attack Check. However, any person in the affected area (or who tries to enter it that Round) must make a Dexterity Save, or take 1d6 damage. A Spray empties the entire magazine.
  • Hard to Control: Machine Pistols are notoriously hard to control when firing more than 9 shots in a Round. Unless the shooter employs a stock, they will suffer a -2 Penalty to their Attack Check, and an unmodified roll of 20 further indicates they have actually shot a random target near them – possibly a friend or ally.

Rifle, Bolt-action (M1903 Springfield, Lee-Enfield, Karabiner 98K, etc.)

The magazine of a typical Bolt-Action Rifle holds 5 bullets, and takes a Round to fully reload. A modern rifle has an effective range of 3,000 feet.

  • Accurate: If a shooter fires only once in a Round, their Attack Check is made at a +2 Bonus.
  • Multiple Shots: The shooter can fire up to 3 shots at a single target in a Round. The amount must be announced before the Attack Check is made. If the Attack is successful, the target takes additional damage equal to the number of shots fired. If the Attack fails, all the shots are wasted.

Rifle, Lever-Action (Winchester Rifle, Marlin 1894, etc.)

The magazine of a typical Lever-Action Rifle holds 7 – 10 bullets, and takes a Round to fully reload. A modern rifle has an effective range of 3,000 feet.

  • Multiple Shots: The shooter can fire up to 6 shots at a single target in a Round. The amount must be announced before the Attack Check is made. If the Attack is successful, the target takes additional damage equal to the number of shots fired. If the Attack fails, all the shots are wasted.

Rifle, Semi-automatic Carbine (M1 Carbine, M1 Garand, AR-15, etc.)

The magazine of a typical Semi-automatic Carbine holds 15 bullets, and takes a Round to fully reload. A Carbine has an effective range of 1,000 feet.

  • Multiple Shots: The shooter can fire up to 9 shots at a single target in a Round. The amount must be announced before the Attack Check is made. If the Attack is successful, the target takes additional damage equal to the number of shots fired. If the Attack fails, all the shots are wasted.

Submachine Gun (Tommy Gun, Sterling, Uzi, etc.)

Submachine Guns use the same type of ammunition as handguns, unlike Assault Rifles and full Machine Guns. A Submachine Gun can fire up to 150 shots per Round in full automatic mode. Most however, only have 30 round magazines. The gun can be reloaded the same Round it is fired if a fresh, fully-loaded magazine is available, but reloading an empty magazine with bullets takes 3 Rounds. A Submachine Gun has an effective range of 500 feet.

  • Multiple Shots: The shooter can fire up to 150 shots at a single target in a Round. The amount must be announced before the Attack Check is made. If the Attack is successful, the target takes additional damage equal to the number of shots fired. If the Attack fails, all the shots are wasted.
  • Spray: If fired in full automatic mode, a Submachine Gun can also be used to turn the entire Nearby area into a Hazard. The shooter does not make a normal Attack Check. However, any person in the affected area (or who tries to enter it that Round) must make a Dexterity Save, or take 1d6 damage. A Spray empties the entire magazine of the gun.

Machine Gun (M1919, M60, PK Machine Gun, etc.)

A Machine Gun is battlefield weapon that is larger and heavier than an Assault Rifle (and much larger than a Submachine Gun), using high caliber ammunition that is typically fed into the weapon in belts. A typical belt will have 100 to 200 rounds on it, but two operators with sufficient ammunition can keep a Machine Gun running for a full Turn (when it overheats and stops working). It takes 1 Round for a single operator to reload a new belt into a Machine Gun without aid. A Machine Gun has a range of 3,000 feet.

  • High Damage: A Machine Gun shot inflicts a base damage of 2d6 + Damage Bonus.
  • Heavy and Awkward: Shooter suffers a -2 Penalty on the Attack Check, unless the gun is securely mounted.
  • Multiple Shots: The shooter can fire up to 150 shots at a single target in a Round. The amount must be announced before the Attack Check is made. If the Attack is successful, the target takes additional damage equal to double the number of shots fired. If the Attack fails, all the shots are wasted.
  • Spray: If fired in full automatic mode, a Machine Gun can also be used to turn a 100’ x 300’ area into a Hazard. The shooter does not make a normal Attack Check. However, any person in the affected area (or who tries to enter it that Round) must make a Dexterity Save, or take 2d6 damage. A Spray uses a full belt of ammunition.

Shotgun, Break-Action

A Break-Action Shotgun can only be loaded with a single shot a time. It can fire either Shot Shells packed with many small pellets, or large Slugs of solid lead. Reloading takes 1 Round. The effective range of the gun is 300 feet.

  • Fire Shot Shell: +2 Bonus against targets within 100 feet.
  • Fire Slug: Inflicts 2d6 + Damage Bonus.

Shotgun, Double-Barreled

A Double-Barreled Shotgun is a break-action weapon with two side-by side barrels that can each be loaded with a single shot at a time. The shooter can fire one barrel at a time, or both simultaneously. Each barrel can be loaded with either Shot Shells packed with many small pellets, or large Slugs of solid lead. Reloading takes 1 Round. The effective range of the gun is 300 feet.

  • Fire Shot Shell (Single Barrel): +2 Bonus on the Attack Check against targets within 100 feet.
  • Fire Shot Shell (Two Barrels): +4 Bonus on the Attack Check against targets within 100 feet.
  • Fire Slug (Single Barrel): Inflicts 2d6 + Damage Bonus.
  • Fire Slug (Two Barrels): Inflicts 2d6 + 4, + Damage Bonus.

Shotgun, Pump-action

A Pump-action Shotgun can hold five shells in its magazine, located in a tube under barrel. The forestock is moved back and forward to expel used shells, and load new ones. The magazine can be loaded with either Shot Shells packed with many small pellets, or large Slugs of solid lead. Reloading the magazine takes 1 Round. The effective range of the gun is 300 feet.

  • Fire Shot Shell: +2 Bonus on the Attack Check against targets within 100 feet.
  • Fire Slug: Inflicts 2d6 + Damage Bonus.

Shotgun, Sawed-Off

A Sawed-Off Shotgun is usually a single-or double barrel Shotgun whose barrel has been shortened to create a more maneuverable and concealable weapon. It has an effective range of only 100 feet, however.

  • Quick Draw: The shooter’s side always wins initiative in the first Round of a Fight against opponents using firearms that do not have the Quick Draw characteristic.
  • Concealable Under a Jacket: Wisdom Check to notice, if the bearer has the weapon inside a garment at least the size of a typical suit jacket.
  • Fire Shot Shell (Single Barrel): +2 Bonus on the Attack Check against targets within 100 feet.
  • Fire Shot Shells (Two Barrels): +4 Bonus on the Attack Check against targets within 100 feet.
  • Fire Slug (Single Barrel): Inflicts 2d6 + Damage Bonus.
  • Fire Slugs (Two Barrels): Inflicts 2d6 + 4, + Damage Bonus.

Yet Another Jester Class

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , ,


Buffoons in a play in open air, by Matthijs Naiveu

Presenting a new iteration of the perennial Jester Class! Like my other “Reimagined” Character Classes for the B/X rules (such as the Dwarven Dungeoneer), this one is built using the five “Special Abilities” + two “Restrictions and Weaknesses” format, has no “Prime Requisite”, and assumes a five-point Alignment system. Otherwise, I’ll let the Jester speak for himself. Or herself. Or theirself. Or is it themselves? One of those!

Human Jester

Abilities: Str: 3d6 | Int: 3d6 | Wis: 1d8+10 | Dex: 1d8+10 | Con: 3d6 | Cha: 3d6
Special Abilities: Acrobatics, Dodge Blows, Imitate Sounds, Jester Routines, Ventriloquism.
Restrictions and Weaknesses: Comical Weapons Only, No Armor.
Hit Dice: d6 per Level, until 9th. Add 2 Hit Points per Level thereafter.
Alignment: Chaotic, Good, or Neutral. Lawful people can be personally funny, but are never irreverent and zany enough to make good Jesters. Evil Jesters are NPC Clowns (see below).
Starting Age: 16+d6
Starting Language(s): Western Common.


Typical Starting Equipment:

  • Ninny Stick, or other Comical Weapon (see below).
  • Puppet.
  • Colorful mask.
  • Fool’s cap, with bells at the end of both points.
  • Parti-colored outfit.
  • Brightly colored wig.
  • Imitation plucked chicken made from soft leather.
  • Throwing pie.
  • Backpack.
  • Spoon.
  • Lantern.
  • 1 pint of oil for lantern.
  • Sponge.
  • Make-up kit.
  • Wineskin (filled with cheap wine).
  • 1 week of rations (all candy and fried foods).
  • Donkey.
  • 1d20 gp.

Your character follows the ancient and honorable profession of the Jester, lightening the hearts of the afflicted. Okay, really they tell a lot of fart jokes. But, they’re really, really funny fart jokes. They tell other jokes as well, but let’s face it, farts are funny. And how funny would it be if you yourself were to fart while reading this? Do it. Nobody’s paying attention. And, if they are, do it anyway.

Why did your character become a Jester? Probably, they farted a lot. Then they learned to fart on command, and honestly, what else are they going to do with that skill? Perhaps they figured out that people will let a Jester get away with almost anything. Like farting as much they do. What the hell are you making your poor character eat?

Sure, there are some Jesters who don’t tell fart Jokes. Who cares about them?

But, all is not sweetness, light, and innocent farts in the world of Comedy. There are other who turn the awesome power of Comedy to Evil ends. Known as “Clowns”, they are known for painting their faces in garish styles, wearing frightful wigs, and cackling in malicious glee at their own jokes. They were responsible for some of the wost atrocities during the Reign of the Monsters, and are universally feared. When a normal Jester meets a Clown, the result is almost always a vicious duel of jokes, capers, pratfalls, and sight gags. Witnessing such awesome comedic power in one place might well drive an ordinary person to insanity.

 

Special Abilities of Human Jesters

Acrobatics: Your can roll a Dexterity Check for your character to do any of the following:

  • Jump up to 10 feet horizontally, or 5 feet vertically.
  • Balance on a ledge or tightrope.
  • Hide behind large objects (but not disappear into the shadows like a Thief can).
  • Climb trees, knotted ropes, and similar objects with large handholds (but not sheer walls like a Thief can).
  • Cartwheel forward or backwards.
  • Flip forward or backward.
  • Juggle up to four objects. (Plus one additional per successful Dexterity Check.)

Additionally, you can make a Saving Throw versus Breath Weapon to allow your character to tumble out of any fall of 10 feet or less, taking no damage at all.

Best of all, your character can fart and belch at will. It would be naughty and wrong, of course, for the GM to insist you role-play that properly – but it could happen. Prepare with beans and beer!

Dodge Blows: At 1st level, a Jester’s base Armor Class is 1 better than normal.

  • At 3rd Level a Jester’s base Armor Class improves by 1 point, and by 1 additional point per two Levels afterward.

Imitate Sounds: With a successful Dexterity Check your Jester can Imitate any sound they have heard before.

  • If your characters wants to imitate a the sound of a Monster other than a normal animal, you roll the Check with a Penalty equal to the Monster’s Hit Dice. The roll to Imitate a Black Dragon is made with a 7 point Penalty, for example. If the Jester’s Dexterity is 13, and they want to imitate a Black Dragon, they must roll a 6 or lower on the d20.
  • Specific people can be Imitated. If the imitated person has a Character Class, however, the Dexterity Check is made with a Penalty equal to the imitated person’s Level. Imitating Jaro the Blacksmith is easy – successfully replicating the infamously whiny voice of the Wizard Prince Naraque is nearly impossible for all but the most skilled Jesters.

Jester Routines: At 2nd Level, your character learns a supernaturally potent joke or gag that they can use once a day.

  • The first Routine you know can be any 1st Level one from the list of Jester Rountines.
  • Your Jester automatically learns a new Routine with each Level gained. This Routine can be of any Level they can perform at they new Level (as shown on the Jester Advancement table).
  • The total Levels of Routines your Jester can perform per day is equal to their Experience Level minus 1.
  • All Routines (except those with the word “pantomime” in their name) require that the target be an intelligent being able to hear and understand the Jester. Pantomimes merely need to be seen.
  • Your character can learn additional Routines either from other Jesters (by deliberate instruction, or by watching them perform and stealing the jokes), or from Fairies and Daimons (the Planar Spirits who have the best senses of humor).
  • There is no limit to the number of Jester Routines your character may potentially know.

Ventriloquism: With a Dexterity Check your character can speak (or Imitate Sounds) without moving their lips, and throw their voice so it appears to be coming from any place up to 50’ distant.

 

Restrictions and Weaknesses of Human Jesters

Comical Weapons Only: Jesters cannot effectively employ normal weapons. However, they are adept at the use of Comical Weapons which would be either impractical or completely ineffective in other hands. The following are some Comical Weapons (and the damage the inflict in hands of a Jester):

  • Slapstick (1d6). This is essentially two boards with a handle, held together by a hinge. It makes a loud “slap” sound when it strikes a target.
  • Ninny Stick / Marotte (1d4). This a rod or stick surmounted by a carved Jester’s head.
  • Ratchet (1d4). This device consists of a cog-wheeled handle with a board attached perpendicularly in such a way that it can be spun, creating a loud clicking noise.
  • Fish (1d3). Any fish at least a foot long can be used as a deadly weapon by a Jester, either in melee, or as a thrown missile.
  • Chicken (1d3). A Jester can use either an actual plucked chicken, or a soft leather imitation of one, as a melee weapon.
  • Throwing Pie (1d3). Harmless (albeit embarrassing) when used by others, Jesters can throw pies with deadly force and accuracy. The range of a pie is the same as a dagger. Jesters are also known to make throwing pies with Holy Water and/or Garlic, for use against Undead, Demons, and Devils.
  • Ball Bat (1d6). The Jester can use any bat originally intended for ball games as weapon. Oddly, the Jester cannot use clubs deliberately constructed for offensive use!
  • Paddle (1d6). A flat board with a handle, such as is used to discipline unruly children. Sadistic Clowns sometimes drill holes in the paddle, making it hurt much more.
  • Wooden Knife (1d4). A wooden blade of the type that is usually a child’s toy. A Jester could use a Wooden Knife, however, to effectively stake a Vampire.
  • Giant Mallet (1d6). The absurdly oversized head of this weapon is often padded, and would be completely unusable as a weapon by ordinary people.
  • Sock / Stocking (1d4). Filled with flour and rocks. The older and stinkier, the better!
  • Shoe (1d3). A jester can use an old shoe either as melee weapon, or as missile (with the same range as a dagger)
  • Squirt Bladder (Special). A squirt bladder (usually hidden behind a flower worn on the jester’s jacket) does no damage by itself, but can be used to splash damaging liquids on targets within 10 feet, who must Save versus Breath Weapon or be hit.

A unique quality of Comical Weapons is that they cannot actually kill any natural animal, or humanoid creature. Whenever the result of an attack indicates that the Jester would slay their target, the victim is actually “Bopped on the Head” – reduced to 1 hp, stunned, and unable to take any actions for as many Rounds as the Jester has Levels. A creature who is Bopped on the Head can be automatically killed by any meanie wielding a regular weapon.

No Armor: A Jester cannot use their Special Abilities while wearing armor of any kind.

 

Destiny at 9th Level

  • Your character will be invited to become the “Court Jester” of some important official – a Duke, Prince, Governor, Senator, or even the Queen herself. If they accept, the Jester will be given a stipend of 5,000 gp per year, as well as free room and board.
  • Your Jester may establish a school of Comedy in any convenient structure – even building a castle if they like! If you do so, they will attract 1d4 Jesters of 1st, 2nd or 3rd Level, and 1d6 ordinary people who wan to become Jesters. Your character might even do this without your permission!

Destiny at 14th Level

  • As a Supreme Fool, your character may walk unmolested into any palace, stronghold, throne room, or royal residence anywhere in the Cosmos, and speak their mind to any ruler of people, Monsters, Bogeymen, or Planar Spirits.
  • No guard (natural or supernatural) will stop them, but they must enter openly and without subterfuge.
  • So long as they do not actually attempt to harm anyone, no punitive measures will ever be taken against your character.
  • Because they realize they are just a character in the eternal “Game of Playing Roles”, a Supreme Fool may address the entity known as “The Game Master” by name – as well as other, equally mysterious beings known as “The Players”.

Human Jester Advancement Table

Exp. Points (Hours played)

Exp. Level

Level Title

Hit Points

THAC0 [Attack Roll Bonus]

Base AC

Max. Level of Routines (Spells) Known

Total Levels of Routines (Spells) per Day.

0

1

Fool

1d6

0

8 [11]

2,000 (12 hours)

2

Buffoon

2d6

18 [+1]

8 [11]

1st

1

4,000 (24 hours)

3

Merrymaker

3d6

18 [+1]

7 [12]

1st

2

8,000 (36 hours)

4

Joker

4d6

17 [+2]

7 [12]

1st

3

15,000 (48 hours)

5

Caperer

5d6

17 [+2]

6 [13]

2nd

4

30,000 (60 hours)

6

Farceur

6d6

16 [+3]

6 [13]

2nd

5

60,000 (72 hours)

7

Prankster

7d6

16 [+3]

5 [14]

2nd

6

120,000 (84 hours)

8

Humorist

8d6

15 [+4]

5 [14]

3rd

7

220,000 (96 hours)

9

Harlequin

9d6

15 [+4]

4 [15]

3rd

8

300,000 (108 hours)

10

Harlequin

9d6+2

14 [+5]

4 [15]

3rd

9

420,000 (120 hours)

11

Harlequin

9d6+4

14 [+5]

3 [16]

4th

10

540,000 (132 hours)

12

Harlequin

9d6+6

13 [+5]

3 [16]

4th

11

660,000 (144 hours)

13

Harlequin

9d6+8

13 [+5]

2 [17]

4th

12

780,000 (156 hours)

14

Supreme Fool

9d6+10

12 [+6]

2 [17]

5th

13

Human Jester Saving Throws

Level

Poison / Death Ray / Disease

Wands / Psionics

Paralysis / Petrification

Dragon Breath / Explosives / Firearms

Spell /Staff / Rod

1

13

14

15

12

16

2

12

13

14

11

15

3

11

12

13

10

14

4

10

11

12

9

13

5

9

10

11

8

12

6

8

9

10

7

11

7

7

8

9

6

10

8

6

7

8

5

9

9

5

6

7

4

8

10 – 14

4

5

6

3

7

Fou regardant à travers ses doigts (Cassel)

Permutations and Variations of the Jester

ELVEN MADCAP

  • Special Abilities: Acrobatics, Dodge Blows, Jester Routines, Nightvision (as per Elven Warrior-Wizard), Resist Paralysis (as per Elven Warrior-Wizard).
  • Restrictions and Weaknesses: Comical Weapons Only, No Armor (For some reason, Elven Jesters are not especially hated by the Bogeymen).
  • Destiny at 9th Level: As Human Jester.
  • Destiny at 14th Level: As Human Jester.

GNOMISH COMEDIAN

  • Special Abilities: Infravision (as per Gnomish Tinkerer), Friend of Burrowing Critters (as per Gnomish Tinkerer), Imitate Sounds, Jester Routines, Ventriloquism.
  • Restrictions and Weaknesses: Comical Weapons Only, Short Legs.
  • Destiny at 9th Level: As Human Jester.
  • Destiny at 14th Level: As Human Jester.

Special: Gnomes are such naturally talented Jesters that they can actually wear armor – and armor that fits them poorly just makes them funnier!

HALFLING HUMORIST

  • Special Abilities: Acrobatics, Dodge Blows, Jester Routines, Nightvision (as per Halfling Rover), Ventriloquism.
  • Restrictions and Weaknesses: Comical Weapons Only (Halfling Humorists can actually use Comical Weapons that appear much too big for them), No Armor.
  • Destiny at 9th Level: As Human Jester.
  • Destiny at 14th Level: As Human Jester.

1st Level Jester Routines

1

Belittling Joke: Recipient becomes 1 foot smaller than their original size per Jester Level, suffering -1 to Strength per foot reduced. Below 1 foot, the Victim becomes 1 inch tall. Victims more than half their original size gain +2 AC. 1 inch tall Recipients gain +4 AC. {1 hour} *Save negates if undesired.

2

Bored to Sleep: A visible living Victim with no more HD than the Jester falls asleep. {Until dawn} *Save negates.

3

Can’t Fool Me: Jester can detect if anything they see or otherwise sense is actually an illusion. [Normal visual range] {Until Jester moves from current position}

4

Climbing the Walls: Recipient can walk (but not run) up walls and across ceilings in a manner similar to a spider. Recipient will not become disoriented by such movement. [1 hour]

5

Comical Leaps: Jester or Recipient can make incredible jumps – up to 30′ forward, and 10′ feet vertically or backwards. The distances increase by 5’ per Jester Level. {1 jump per Experience Level of Jester}

6

Down, Boy!: Jester calms all hostile, frightened, or otherwise uncontrollable animals, whether wild or domestic, in 50’ radius. {1 hour}

7

Emboldening Joke: All Fear effects, mundane or magical, are removed from the Recipient. [1 person]

8

Fooled Ya!: Jester can make an item fool Detect effects (such as Detect Magic) in a desired way. [Object up to 5lbs] {Next New Moon}

9

Hypnotism Act: Jester commands the attention of one person with 25’. Victim will perform easy, apparently safe requests for as long as the Jester pays undivided attention to them. Afterward, the Victim will forget the whole experience. {No more than 1 hour} * Save negates.

10

Joy Buzzer: Jester inflicts 1d6 points of electrical Damage with a touch – and double damage if the Victim is wearing metal armor. [1 touched target]

11

Oooh, Spooky Noises: Jester creates phantom sounds (other than comprehensible speech) equal in maximum volume to that of 4 people per Jester Level. [within 50’] {1 hour} *Save reveals illusion.

12

Prestidigitation: Jester can perform minor tricks of an entertaining variety – such as a Cup and Balls routine, making a coin disappear and reappear, etc.

2nd Level Jester Routines

1

Analgesic Joke: Jester or Recipient become immune to all pain, mundane or magical. {Until dawn}

2

Bewildering Gag: Victim becomes disoriented, and acts randomly. Roll d10 each round: 1-3 = normal action, 7 – 10 = pointless action, 10 = attacks nearest foe or friend. [50 feet] {1 Turn} *Save negates.

3

Demoralizing Satire: All intelligent creatures within earshot, other than the Jester’s fiends and allies, must check Morale. There is no Save other than a successful Morale Check.

4

Healing Jest: A Recipient is cured of 1 point of Damage per own Experience Level (or HD if a creature). For example: A 3rd Level Recipient regains 3 lost Hit Points. [1 Recipient other than the Jester]

5

Know Your Audience: Jester learns a target’s actual Alignment. [1 Target in visual range] *Save negates.

6

Liberating Insight: The Recipient is cured of all paralyzing or movement inhibiting effects.

7

Romantic Comedy: The Recipient is overcome with love for the Jester. If the Jester does not properly reciprocate, or ever mistreats the Recipient in any way, they will leave the Jester (and hate their former love forever after). [1 person who can hear Jester] * Save negates.

Player Characters are immune to the effects of Romantic Comedy.

8

Rope Trick: A length of rope up to 30’ long stands upright the air, and can be climbed to an invisible (and otherwise inaccessible) hiding place. Hidden people can see the out, but not be seen. The rope can be pulled inside, and is also the only means of exit. {Until dawn}

9

Scramble Thoughts: The Jester or Recipient is immune to the effect of ESP. {1 hour}

10

Seeing Double: Jester surrounds themselves with as many illusory copies of their body as their own Experience Level. An attacker must make a successful Save to hit or affect the real Jester {1 hour}

3rd Level Jester Routines

1

Babbling Idiot: Victim loses the ability to read, comprehend, or speak any language. [1 touched victim] {1 hour} * Save negates.

2

Enraging Pantomime: Jester performs a silent pantomime routine that causes all who see it to immediately go berserk and attack the nearest creature. [25’ radius] {1d6 Rounds} *Save negates

3

Fart Blast: Jester emits a blast of gale-force wind. Small creatures are blown back 50’ each Round, Human-sized creatures are blown back 25’, and large creatures cannot move forward. Missile attacks into the wind automatically miss. [25’ x 300’ column in front of Jester] {6 Rounds} *Save negates.

4

Horrific Fart (or Belch): Jester emits a 25’ diameter cloud of vapors that smell horrifically bad. Anyone inside is nauseated, and unable to do anything but retch and flee. [1 hour]

5

Knock ‘em Speechless: Everyone within a 25′ radius must Save, or lose the ability to speak (or use magic that requires speech) [1d6 Rounds] *Save negates

6

Why Don’tcha: Jester causes one Victim to obey a reasonable sounding directive which can be phrased in one sentence. {Until dawn, or a suggested task is completed} * Save negates.

4th Level Jester Routines

1

Blessing of Comedy: Jester or Recipient is freed from any supernatural curses currently afflicting them. A “curse” is defined by any Spell which includes the word “curse” in its description.

2

Blistering Insult: Victim suffers 1d4 points of Damage per own Exp. Level or HD (if a creature). For example: A 5th Level target loses 5d4 Hit Points. [1 victim within earshot]. *Save negates.

3

Disappearing Act: Jester is teleported to any place they can see. [Only Jester]

4

Humiliating Jibe: Every being not allied with the Jester within a 50′ foot radius must Save versus Wisdom or be so overcome with embarrassment that they run away until they can no longer be seen. Affected beings stay embarrassed for 1 hour. *Save negates, and new Save can be made each Round.

5

Hurry Up!: Victim moves twice as fast as normal. Receives +3 on AC; two actions per Round; and +3 on Saves versus Wands & Breath. Loses 1 point Constitution, and ages 1 year! {1 hour} *Save negates

6

Mass Confusion: All within 50’ (except Jester) become disoriented, and act randomly. Roll d10 each Round per victim: 1-3 = normal action, 7 – 10 = strange and pointless action, 10 = attacks nearest foe or friend. {1 Turn} *Save negates.

7

Put the Crowd to Sleep: As many visible, living Victims as the Jester has Levels fall asleep. Those with greater HD than the Jester are immune. {Until dawn} *Save negates.

8

Rain of Fish: A large quantity of real, living fish fall from the sky or ceiling. All witnesses under 5 HD must Save or stare dumbfounded (and unable to attack) for 6 Rounds. Dumbfounded creatures take 1 hp of damage per Round from falling fish. [150’ radius around Jester] {1 Minute}

9

Shout: Jester emits a shriek that deafens every being within 50’ (except themselves), inflicts 4d6 points of Damage, and shatter glass and crystal. *Save negates deafness, and reduces damage by half.

10

You Really Like Me: Targeted creature regards the Caster as a friend who has their best interests at heart. [1 Monster or person, but not a Spirit or Undead] {30 days, minus Monster’s Int. score} * Save negates.

5th Level Jester Routines

1

I See Right Through You: Jester sees things exactly as they are, or were before they being affected by any Spells or Special Abilities that produce illusions, Glamours, or Transmutations. [Visual range] {1 hour}

2

Knock ‘Em Dead: 4d8 HD of intelligent living beings (lowest HD beings first) laugh themselves to death. Beings with 8 or more HD are immune. *Save negates.

3

Irresistible Laughter: Target is unable to do anything but laugh for 6 Rounds, and must thereafter Save every 6 Rounds to stop. A successful Save ends the laughter. *No Save for first 6 Rounds, Save negates thereafter.

4

Laugh at Death: Recipient cannot be harmed by offensive Spells (or Maledictions) for the duration of the effect, and is immune to XP loss or Ability damage from contact with the Undead. [Jester, or 1 Recipient] {Until dawn}

5

Pantomime Wall: Jester creates an invisible wall that blocks movement. The nearest part of the wall must begin within arm’s length of the Jester. [A 50’ x 50’ wall, or 25’ diameter ring 20’ high] {1 hour}

6

Stupefying Joke: Victim’s Intelligence is reduced to 2. [25’] {Until next full moon} *Save negates

The B/X Halfling Reimagined

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


Panzoasia800

Long patronized and taken for granted by the other Peoples of Panzoasia, the Humblekin (as they call themselves) are starting to demand some respect! This version of the B/X Halfling expands the class to 14 Levels, rethinks some classic tropes, and adds some new abilities. In addition to the obvious, my other influences include “The Wizard of Oz”; “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory”; old Folk and Country songs, and the folktales of household helper fairies such as Brownies, Hobs, Robs, and Dobbies. These Halflings are more the downtrodden working-folk of a fantasy Appalachia, or Black Country, than the happy yoeman farmers of an idealized English landscape. They’ve got good reason to adventure!

See The B/X Dwarf Reimagined for the underlying assumptions of the Panzoasian character classes.

Halfling Rover

Abilities: Str: 3d6 | Int: 3d6 | Wis: 3d6 | Dex: 1d8+10 | Con: 1d8+10 | Cha: 3d6
Special Abilities: Expert with Slings and Thrown Objects, Hide, Nightvision, Odd Jobs, Small Target.
Restrictions and Weaknesses: Gourmand, Small Stature.
Hit Dice: d6 per Level, until 9th. Add 2 Hit Points per Level thereafter.
Alignment: Any. Halflings in general are usually Good, but Halfling Rovers are often rebels who have embraced the freedom of Chaos.
Starting Age: 15+d6. (Panzoasian Halflings mature at the same rate as Humans.)
Starting Language(s): Western Common (+ Western Elven if Elf-kin, Western Gnomish if Gnome-kin, or Western Dwarven if Dwarf-kin).


Typical Starting Equipment:
• Home-made Quilted Armor (AC 8[11]).
• Short Sword scavenged from an old battlefield.
• 2 Throwing Knives.
• Bag of 6 sharp-edged rocks for throwing.
• Haversack.
• Patchwork pants or skirt, held up with suspenders.
• Clogs (if Man-kin or Elf-kin).
• Small salt-clay holy symbol, or pierced gold coin, worn on a string.
• Coin purse.
• Carrying pole (with tied bundle on end).
• Box of Odd Job tools (hammer, file, small saw, nails, awl, needle & thread, glue packet, buttons, etc.).
• Tin Whistle or Jaw Harp.
• Piece of straw (held in mouth).
• Bag of flavored chewing weed.
• Copy of “Standing Tall as Humblekin – A Book for Us”.
• 12 Rushlights, with holder.
• Goose feather pillow.
• Flask of homemade “moonshine” liquor.
• Bar of homemade soap.
• Sponge.
• Small frying pan.
• 1 week of rations (cured sausage, hardtack bread, cheese, dried potatoes, turnips, and hard-boiled eggs,).
• Short-legged dog (resembles a Corgi).
• 10 silver pieces, and 10 copper pieces.


Your character is a young Humblekin – called a “Halfling” by the Dwarves, Elves, Gnomes, and Humans. Well, the others should know by now that the Humblekin aren’t just half of anything!

Why has your character decided to rove as an adventurer? Are they dissatisfied with the idea of laboring for “The Bigs” the rest of their years? Do they want a lifestyle that they’ll never have if they just do what’s expected of them and act like “a good little Halfling”. Are they determined to see the world – and not just the small farming plot their parents rent for more money than they ever seem to make? Perhaps your character is less than thrilled by the prospect of working the coal mines all day long – and hacking up black dust all night. Or, maybe they’re one of the few well-off Humblekin, who wants something more than to just take over the local Candymaker’s Guild.

Others may think your character can’t handle the challenges of Monster-haunted dungeons and wilderness, but the Humblekin have a knack for hiding and avoiding harm. Being small makes it hard for the lumbering “Bigs” to catch your character. Having to survive on the margins has taught Humblekin how to repair anything (at least temporarily). You’re much stronger and faster than you look – your People have had to be. And generations of poverty have made the Humblekin able to use ordinary rocks as deadly weapons!

To which of the four “Kins” does your character belong? Were their parents “Man-kin” living in a shack, or in the slums of a Human city? Are they one of the “Elf-kin” who dwell on the lowest level of hollowed out Zoswood trees – or even inside giant Homestead Mushrooms! Are they a “Gnome-kin”, born in a burrow under an artificial earth-mound? Or, were they born to the “Dwarf-kin” who farm lichen, raise goats, and mine the “ignoble” minerals that Dwarves are too proud to dig up themselves? One thing is for certain – it’s the constant hard work of the Humblekin that makes it possible for the vainglorious Humans to sail their big ships; for the Elves to play their silly games; for the Gnomes to make their strange devices; and for the Dwarves to tunnel in search of iron, gold, and gemstones.

As Humblekin, your character stands about 3 feet tall. Their skin tone is similar to that of the local Humans, but somewhat ruddier. They probably have dimples, and an upturned, “button” nose. If male, they probably grow long sideburns, but have no other facial hair. The Humblekin often sport fanciful hairstyles that incorporate large curls. Traditionally, they dress in patchwork. If your character is Man-kin, they look very much like an extremely short Human. If they are Elf-kin, they have pointed ears. If your character is Gnome-kin, they tend to put on weight, have thick-soled hairy feet, and don’t need (or like) to wear shoes. If they are Dwarf-kin they are stoutly built, also traditionally eschew footwear – and if male, can actually have a thick mustache!

The inhabitants of Halfling communities are as diverse as Humans in their occupations and skills. The Halfling Rover Class represents the typical abilities of those Humblekin who choose to leave home, and find themselves on the road.

 

Special Abilities of Halfling Rovers

Expert with Slings and Thrown Objects: When your character uses a sling, or a thrown object (such as a throwing knife or rock), you get an additional +1 Bonus to your Attack and Damage Rolls.

  • In your character’s hands, a sling inflicts 1d4+1 damage (2 – 5), and ordinary rocks do 1d3+1 (2 – 4) damage.
  • Halfling Rovers can pick up almost any hard objects and use them as improvised projectiles – even ones other people would find too awkward to use. A Hafling Rover in a rocky field is something to be feared!

Hide: You can roll a Dexterity Check for your character to completely conceal themselves in their environment, or blend into shadows, so long as they remain still.

Nightvision: Your character can see at night (or in conditions of very low light) like a cat, and still distinguish colors. They cannot see in absolute darkness (such as occurs underground), however.

Odd Jobs: If your character has their set of Odd Job tools with them, you can roll a Dexterity Check for them to do any of the following:

  • Repair any broken item (the repair lasting until the end of the adventure).
  • Repair ripped clothing or cloth items (until the end of the adventure).
  • Deactivate a trap that they know exists. (They have no special ability to detect traps, however).
  • Build a shelter, or other construction (provided they have enough materials).
  • Rig up temporary containers, bags, or other items to transport treasure.
  • Re-tailor clothing into other shapes, including usable ropes and tents.
  • Re-configure found objects into usable weapons or armor that will last until the end of the adventure. Left alone with pots and pans, a Halfling might make temporary plate mail!
  • Sew up bleeding wounds (restoring 1 hp), or remove parasites such as Green Slime.

Small Target: Your character get a +2 Bonus to their Armor Class when they are attacked by human-sized opponents.

  • When attacked by opponents up to twice the size of a Human, the Bonus is +3.
  • When attacked by opponents more than twice Human size, your AC Bonus is +4. Dragons and Giants hate having to fight Halflings!

Restrictions and Weaknesses of Halfling Rovers

Gourmand: Halflings tend to be almost constantly hungry, and are notably obsessed with good food and drink.

  • Saves versus Charm Person, Quest, and Geas spells (and similar kinds of mental manipulation) are made with a 2 Penalty, if the would-be charmer offers your character something tasty to eat or drink.
  • On the positive side, everyone knows that Halflings tend to be great cooks, and can make almost anything taste good!

Small Stature: Because your character is only 3 feet tall, they cannot use armor or weapons sized for anyone larger.

  • Your character must wield any hand-to-hand weapon more than a foot long with two hands. They cannot use any weapon more than 5 feet long at all.
  • Note that despite being half the size of a Human, Halflings can move just as fast as one!

Destiny at 9th Level

If upon attaining 9th Level (or any time after) your character settles down into a predominantly Halfling community, they will be elected Sheriff (or Headman).

  • If they build a new Halfling community instead, it will attract d100+50 new settlers of your character’s Alignment, who will confirm your character as Sheriff or Headman.
  • If, however, your character continues to wander, they will attract 1d4 1st level Halfling Rovers, who will become your character’s companions and supporters.

Destiny at 14th Level

Once they attain 14th Level, your character’s renown is such that they will be widely considered the greatest living Humblekin.

  • Other Humblekin will address your character with the title “Daddy” or “Momma”, and all Halfling Sheriffs will be expected to bow to your character’s wishes.
  • Your character’s word will automatically override that of any other judges at Halfling beauty pageants, cooking contests, talent shows, and similar events.

Permutations and Variations of the Halfling Rover

DWARVEN ROVER
A Dwarven misfit who from a young age has wandered the roads and byways of the surface world – whether by choice or necessity.

  • Special Abilities: Infravision (as per Dwarven Dungeoneer), Expert with Slings and Thrown Objects, Hide, Odd Jobs, Resist Magic (as per Dwarven Dungeoneer).
  • Restrictions and Weaknesses: Can Only Wear Dwarven Armor (as per Dwarven Dungeoneer), Short Legs (as per Dwarven Dungeoneer).
  • Destiny at 9th Level: As Human Fighter.
  • Destiny at 14th Level: As Human Fighter.

ELVEN ROVER
A wandering Elf alienated from their own People – perhaps an orphan , or the child of an exiled mother.

  • Special Abilities: Expert with Slings and Thrown Objects, Hide, Nightvision, Odd Jobs, Resist Paralysis (as per Elven Warrior-Wizard).
  • Restrictions and Weaknesses: Enmity of the Bogeymen (as per Elven Warrior-Wizard), Slight Build and Large Ears (as per Elven Warrior-Wizard).
  • Destiny at 9th Level: As Human Fighter.
  • Destiny at 14th Level: As Human Fighter.
  • Special: Your first language is Common, and if you speak Elven, you do so poorly.

GNOMISH ROVER
An itinerant Gnome who makes their living however they can.

  • Special Abilities: Infravision (as per Gnomish Tinkerer), Expert with Slings and Thrown Objects, Friend of Burrowing Critters (as per Gnomish Tinkerer), Hide, Odd Jobs.
  • Restrictions and Weaknesses: Short Legs, Small Stature.
  • Destiny at 9th Level: As Gnomish Tinkerer.
  • Destiny at 14th Level: As Gnomish Tinkerer.

HUMAN ROVER
A vagrant who lives by their wits.

  • Special Abilities: Expert with Slings and Thrown Objects, Hide, Odd Jobs.
  • Restrictions and Weaknesses: None.
  • Destiny at 9th Level: As Human Fighter.
  • Destiny at 14th Level: As Human Fighter.

 

Halfling Rover Advancement Table

Exp. Points (Hours played)

Exp. Level

Level Title

Hit Points

THAC0 [Attack Roll Bonus]

0

1

Humble Walker

1d6

19 [0]

1,500 (8 hours)

2

Humble Hiker

2d6

18 [+1 ]

4,000 (24 hours)

3

Humble Rambler

3d6

18 [+1]

7,000 (36 hours)

4

Humble Scout

4d6

17 [+2]

13,000 (48 hours)

5

Humble Roamer

5d6

17 [+2]

25,000 (60 hours)

6

Humble Trekker

6d6

16 [+3]

50,000 (72 hours)

7

Humble Journeyer

7d6

16 [+3]

100,000 (84 hours)

8

Humble Explorer

8d6

15 [+4]

180,000 (96 hours)

9

Humble Wayfarer (or Sheriff)

9d6

15 [+4]

300,000 (108 hours)

10

Humble Wayfarer (or Sheriff)

9d6+2

14 [+5]

420,000 (120 hours)

11

Humble Wayfarer (or Sheriff)

9d6+4

14 [+5]

540,000 (132 hours)

12

Humble Wayfarer (or Sheriff)

9d6+6

13 [+6]

660,000 (144 hours)

13

Humble Wayfarer (or Sheriff)

9d6+8

13 [+6]

780,000 (156 hours)

14

Daddy of All Kin / Momma of All Kin

9d6+10

12 [+7]

Halfling Rover Saving Throws

Level

Poison / Death Ray / Disease

Wands / Psionics

Paralysis / Petrification

Dragon Breath / Explosives / Firearms

Spell /Staff / Rod

1

12

13

14

11

15

2

11

12

13

10

14

3

10

11

12

9

13

4

9

10

11

8

12

5

8

9

10

7

11

6

7

8

9

6

10

7

6

7

8

5

9

8

5

6

7

4

8

9

4

5

6

3

7

10 – 14

3

4

5

2

6


Typical Names for Halfling Men

  • Jonny
  • Kenan
  • Carrow
  • Tewey
  • Perserverence
  • Geren
  • Bambo
  • Woody
  • Post
  • Hammer

Typical Names for Halfling Women

  • Emmee
  • Soo
  • Jo
  • Patience
  • Rosey
  • Bella
  • Mazey
  • Meadow
  • Cookie
  • Sparkle

Halflings often name their children after objects, foodstuffs, animals, places, and virtues. They also freely adopt Elven, Dwarven and Gnomish names. Additionally, it is common for a Halfling’s name to actually be a hyphenated combination of two names – for example, “Jonny-Post” for a man, or “Cookie-Soo” for a woman. Halflings surnames tend to consist of a geographical location prefixed with a descriptor. For example, “Darkwood”, “Whitehill” or “Fairmeadow”. Married couples combine their surnames with a hyphen. An adult Halfling can choose to use either their father’s or mother’s original surname – either is considered acceptable, so long as the Halfling is consistent in its use.